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Patient Care

Through our partnership with The University of Kansas Health System, we offer expert care and advanced, innovative treatment options for people with Parkinson's disease and related conditions, as well as movement disorders, like Huntington's disease, dystonia and others.  

Educational Series on Parkinson's Disease

Understanding Parkinson's Disease:
A Virtual Series for Persons Living with PD, Caregivers and Healthcare Professionals

Presented by the University of Kansas Medical Center Parkinson’s Foundation Krupp Smith Family Foundation Center of Excellence and the Kansas City Clinical Neuroscience Society

Click each course title below to register.  You must register for each course separately.

Dr. Stuart Isaacson
Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center of Boca
Boca Raton, Florida

Stuart Isaacson

Dr. Stuart Isaacson is director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center of Boca Raton in Florida. He is also the medical director of the not-for-profit organization, Parkinson’s Research and Education Foundation in Boca Raton.

Dr. Isaacson’s research focus is the development of new treatments for Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, including tardive dyskinesia, essential tremor, dystonia,  and atypical forms of parkinsonism. He has been involved in numerous clinical trials and served on national and international committees for many drug development programs and trials, as well as for the Parkinson Study Group and the movement disorders section of the American Academy of Neurology. A prolific author and coauthor of abstracts, journal articles, and book chapters, Dr. Isaacson lectures frequently and has presented abstracts at national and international scientific meetings and symposia for patients.

Dr. Isaacson earned his medical degree from Northwestern University/Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago,  Illinois. He completed an internship at St Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital in  New York, New York, a residency in neurology, and a fellowship in movement disorders from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, also in New York, and a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health. 

Dr. Rajesh Pahwa
Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Center
University of Kansas Medical Center
Kansas City, Kansas

Rajesh Pahwa

Rajesh Pahwa, M.D., is the Laverne and Joyce Rider Professor of Neurology, chief of the Parkinson's and Movement Disorder Division, and director of the Parkinson’s Foundation Krupp Smith Family Foundation Center of Excellence at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Dr. Pahwa's research interests are centered around the various aspects of Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and other movement disorders. He has participated in over 300 medical and surgical clinical trials for Parkinson’s disease, other forms of parkinsonism and essential tremor.
He has published more than 300 peer-reviewed articles, chapters, and abstracts in leading neurology and movement disorder journals.  Dr. Pahwa is the co-editor of "Handbook of Parkinson's Disease," 3rd, 4th, and 5th editions; "Therapy of Parkinson's Disease," 3rd edition; and "Handbook of Essential Tremor and other Tremor Disorders." He also is co-author of the book "Parkinson's Disease: Questions and Answers," 4th edition.

Moderator

Dr. Kelly Lyons
Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Center
University of Kansas Medical Center
Kansas City, Kansas

Kelly Lyons

Dr. Lyons is a Research Professor of Neurology and Director of Research and Education for the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Center at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City, Kansas.  Dr. Lyons' primary areas of research are Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. In addition to more than 200 articles and presentations to her credit, she is co-editor of the Handbook of Parkinson's Disease, 3rd, 4th and 5th editions; Therapy of Parkinson's Disease, 3rd Edition; and Handbook of Essential Tremor and Other Tremor Disorders. Dr. Lyons is President of the International Essential Tremor Foundation.

Presenting Sponsor

Supernus

Platinum Sponsor

Amneal

Gold Sponsors

AcadiaAcorda logo

Silver Sponsor

Kyowa logo   Mitsubishi Tanabe  Medtronic logo

Bronze Sponsor

Abbott logoBoston Scientific logo  AbbVie logo

We will discuss the advancements in the diagnostic tools used to help confirm or refute the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease earlier and more accurately.  These include neuroimaging, skin biopsy and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) testing.  We will also discuss the current theories behind the slowing of PD progression and current research studies testing these theories.  Finally, we will discuss when to start treatment and treatment options for early PD.  We will discuss the various early treatment options available and some of the considerations when choosing the initial treatment strategy, as well as pointers to getting the best response from your medication. 

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This lecture will start with levodopa, discussing the timing, dosing, and the various forms of levodopa including immediate release, controlled release, extended release, inhaled, infused, and fractionated. We will also discuss the myths regarding the use of levodopa, including when to start and long-term efficacy of levodopa.  ON, OFF and dyskinesia will be introduced during this lecture. We will provide insight to understanding and recognizing OFF episodes and review motor and non-motor symptoms that may worsen during OFF time. We will also define dyskinesia and discuss how to differentiate from tremor.  We will introduce initial treatment options for OFF and dyskinesia such as changing the timing or dose of levodopa, using on-demand therapy, and adding an additional medication. 

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This lecture will continue to discuss OFF and dyskinesia. We will review oral treatment options for OFF and dyskinesia as these symptoms worsen.  On-demand therapies will be discussed, including the basic concept of the use of on-demand therapies, how these therapies are used in conjunction with other PD medications, as well as the various times when they can be used. We will review continuous levodopa infusion, deep brain stimulation (DBS) and focused ultrasound (FUS) as treatment options for PD. The lecture will include when these therapies should be considered, who is a good candidate, a review of outcomes, possible side effects, and how these therapies fit in with other PD treatments. 

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This lecture will review the non-motor symptoms that can occur even before a PD diagnosis, as well as the various symptoms that may occur throughout the disease course.  Treatment options for non-motor symptoms, particularly drooling, orthostatic hypotension, hallucinations, delusions, memory impairment, depression, and anxiety will be reviewed.

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The final lecture will be a wrap up with important pointers from the previous lectures. It will also include a discussion regarding the importance of seeing a PD specialist, having a multi-disciplinary care team including dieticians, physical, occupational and speech therapists, social workers, psychologists, pharmacists, etc., getting the most from your doctor’s visit, questions to ask, information to provide to your doctor, and resources available for those with PD, caregivers, and loved ones.

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Clinical Subspecialties

Dystonia is a type of movement disorder that causes involuntary muscle contractions or spasms in the body. Rarer than Parkinson's disease, its cause is not completely understood. Dystonia is diagnosed through a multi-step process. 

Visit The University of Kansas Health System to learn more or schedule an appointment.

Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common movement disorders, affecting up to 10 million people in the United States. It can affect persons of any age, although it is most common with advancing age, causing the hands, head, voice, trunk or legs to shake rhythmically and uncontrollably.

Visit The University of Kansas Health System to learn more or schedule an appointment.

Huntington's disease is a genetic disorder that affects the behavior, cognition and motor control of thousands of people in the United States. It is an adult-onset genetic disease, passed from parent to child, and requires increasing assistance for the patient over the condition's 15- to 20-year progression.

Visit The University of Kansas Health System to learn more or schedule an appointment.

Lewy body dementia (LBD) can be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson's disease (PD), yet it is responsible for 15-20% of dementia cases. In general, if the dementia and symptoms such as slowness, stiffness, tremor, walking and balance problems occur within a year of each other, a diagnosis of LBD is made. 

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Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is an atypical form of parkinsonism that can initially look very similar to Parkinson's disease, including symptoms such as slowness, stiffness, balance problems and tremor, along with autonomic symptoms, which include orthostatic hypotension (dizziness when changing positions such as sitting to standing), urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction.  

Visit The University of Kansas Health System to learn more or schedule an appointment.

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive disease that results from nerve cell damage in the brain, which causes decreased dopamine levels. This results in symptoms such as tremors, shaking, stiffness, loss of balance and other involuntary muscle movements.

Parkinson's disease is not curable, but the majority of symptoms can be controlled. At The University of Kansas Health System, we offer expert care and advanced, innovative treatment options to help those living with Parkinson’s disease enjoy a full life.

Visit The University of Kansas Health System to learn more or schedule an appointment.

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is an atypical form of parkinsonism that can initially look very similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). It affects people 40 years of age and older and progresses rapidly. Symptoms include unexplained falling, speech difficulty and cognitive problems. 

Visit The University of Kansas Health System to learn more or schedule an appointment.

Make an Appointment

To schedule an appointment at the Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorder Center, please call 913-574-0038. Visit The University of Kansas Health System to learn more about the treatment of movement disorders and to view additional scheduling options.

Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorder Center

University of Kansas Medical Center
Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorder Center
Mailstop 3042
3901 Rainbow Boulevard
Kansas City KS 66160
Appointments: 913-574-0038