Skip to main content.

Dorothy Hughes, Ph.D., MHSA

Dorothy Hughes portrait
Assistant Professor, Population Health

Assistant Dean, Student Affairs - Salina Campus

Assistant Professor, Population Health

Professional Background

Currently, I teach in the MD, MHSA, and PhD programs. My teaching techniques include active lecture and group discussion, and I am honing my flipped classroom, case-based learning, and service learning skills. I deliver course content in online, in-person, or hybrid formats. My goal is for students to have a strong understanding of how healthcare systems can and do work (in the US and other countries), including how operational, financial, and policy concepts interlock. I am passionate about helping students understand how they, as professionals, can engage in the policy-making process in meaningful and productive ways. I am actively engaged in encouraging participation in the joint MD/MHSA program and am a strong proponent of rural educational experiences.

Education and Training
  • BA, International Studies, American University School of International Service, Washington, DC
  • MHSA, Health Services Administration, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, KS
  • PhD, Health Policy and Management, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, KS
Professional Affiliations
  • Kansas Rural Health Association, President, 2024 - Present
  • Kansas Rural Health Association, President Elect, 2023 - 2023
  • American College of Surgeons, Member, 2021 - Present
  • Kansas Rural Health Association, Member, 2021 - Present
  • Association of University Programs in Healthcare Administration, Pillar 1 Strategic Plan Committee, Member, 2020 - 2021
  • Association for Surgical Education, Member, 2019 - Present
  • Association of University Programs in Healthcare Administration, Member, 2019 - Present

Research

Overview

My research agenda is two-pronged, focusign on the rural health workforce and medical education. I am interested in the recruitment and retention of rural physicians, specifically general surgeons. I also investigate other topics related to surgical services, surgical education, and the composition of the surgical team. My medical education research focuses on curricular innovations and professional development related to Health Systems Science (HSS), and I am a 2023 American Medical Association HSS Scholar. I primarily use qualitative methods but also conduct quantitative and mixed methods studies. Being in Population Health is especially rewarding because it is inter-disciplinary. I particularly enjoy bringing together principles from health services research, sociology, and behavioral economics.

Publications
  • Hughes, Dorothy, Hanson, Melissa., N, Alseidi, Adnan, Romanelli, John, Vassiliou, Melina, Asbun, Horacio. 2023. Factors Influencing Surgeon Well-being: Qualitatively Exploring the Joy of Surgery. Surgical Endoscopy
  • Fowler, Brooke, Hughes, Dorothy. 2023. Infection and Recurrence Rates in Rural Inguinal Hernia Repair. Kansas Journal of Medicine, 16
  • Hughes, Dorothy, Romero-Hernandez, Fernanda, Miller, Phoebe, Warner, Susanne, Babicky, Michele, Visser, Brendan, Alseidi, Adnan. 2022. The Job Market for HPB Surgeons: Leadership Perspectives on Surgeon Skillsets, Training Pathways, and Hiring. HPB
  • Hughes, Dorothy, Williams, Jessica., A., Brooks, Joanna., Veazey. 2021. Movers and Stayers: What Birthplaces Can Teach Us About Rural Practice Choice Among Midwestern General Surgeons. The Journal of Rural Health, 37 (1), 55-60. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jrh.12428
  • Barkus, Obed, Hughes, Dorothy. 2021. COVID-19 Impact on Regional Medical Campus Education: Student Perspectives. Journal of Regional Medical Campuses, 4 (3)
  • Hughes, Dorothy, Brooks, Joanna., Veazey. 2020. Using Qualitative Research to Study the Profession of Rural Surgery. Surgical Clinics of North America, 100 (5), 949-970. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.suc.2020.05.011
  • Hughes, D, Cook, M., R, Deal, S., B, Hughes, T., G, Sarap, M, Brasel, K, Alseidi, A. 2019. Rural surgeons' perspectives on necessity of post-residency training are stable across generations.. American journal of surgery, 217 (2), 296-300