Peter G. Smith, Ph.D.

Interim Chair
Professor
Director, Institute for Neurological Discoveries
Co-Director, Kansas Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Reasearch Center
Duke University, 1978


Research Focus

Autonomic neurobiology, peripheral sensory axon growth, pain targets, neuroplasticity and regeneration; developmental disabilities.

Research Interests

Nerves regulate function and structure of peripheral cells. Target cells in turn provide molecular signals that govern the quantity and type of innervation they receive. Our research examines this interplay between nerve and target and the factors that govern neuronal growth and degeneration. We are especially interested in how this relationship is affected by gonadal steroid hormones such as estrogen.  Our recent studies have identified locally produced angiotensin II as a therapeutic target in inflammatory pain syndromes.  We are also examining the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms in developmental neurological disorders using rodent and cellular models, and assessing contributions of key epigenetic pathways to sensory dysfunction in autism-related disorders.

Recent Publications

Bhattacherjee A, Liao Z, and Smith PG.  (2014)  Trophic factor and hormonal regulation of neurite outgrowth in the sensory neuron-like 50B11cell line. Neuroscience Letters 558: 120-125

Krizsan-Agbas D, Winter MK, Eggiman LS, Meriwether J, Berman NE, Smith PG*, McCarson KE. (2014)  Gait Analysis at Multiple Speeds Reveals Differential Functional and Structural Outcomes in Response to Graded Spinal Cord Injury.  J Neurotrauma 31: 846-856. *Corresponding author

Doss A and Smith PG (2014) Langerhans cells regulate cutaneous innervation density and mechanical sensitivity in mouse footpad.  Neuroscience Letters 578: 55-60.

Brauer MM, Smith PG. (2014)  Estrogen and female reproductive tract innervation: cellular and molecular mechanisms of autonomic neuroplasticity.  Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, in press.

Tague S, Smith PG. (2014)  Vitamin D deficiency leads to sensory and sympathetic denervation of the rat synovium.  Neuroscience, Sep 2;279C:77-93. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2014.08.035. [Epub ahead of print].

Bhattacherjee A, Rumi MAK, Staecker H, Smith PG. (2013) Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 Mediates Estrogen-Regulated Sensory Axon Plasticity in the Adult Female Reproductive Tract. Journal of Neuroscience 33: 1050-1061.

Chakrabarty A and Smith PG. (2013) Angiotensin II receptor AT2 activation is required for cutaneous sensory hyperinnervation and hypersensitivity in a rat hind paw model of inflammatory pain.  Journal of Pain 14:  1053-1065103.

Liao, Z and Smith PG. (2011) Adaptive Plasticity of Vaginal Innervation in Term Pregnant Rat.  Reproductive Sciences,18: 1237-1245.

Tague SE, Clarke GL, Winter MK, McCarson KE, Wright DH, Smith PG. (2011) Vitamin D deficiency promotes skeletal muscle hypersensitivity and sensory hyperinnervation.  Journal of Neuroscience 31: 138728-13738 (Featured in This Week in The Journal).

Clarke GL, Bhattacherjee A, Tague S, Hasan W, and Smith PG. (2010) Beta adrenoceptor blockers increase cardiac ventricular sympathetic innervation by inhibiting autoreceptor suppression of axon outgrowth.  Journal of Neuroscience 30: 12446-12454. 

Last modified: Oct 07, 2014

Contact

Peter G. Smith, Ph.D.
Interim Chair
Professor
Director, Institute for Neurological Discoveries
Co-Director, Kansas Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Reasearch Center

2098 HLSIC
3901 Rainbow Blvd.
Kansas City, KS 66160

P: (913) 588-7409
F: (913) 588-5677
psmith@kumc.edu

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