Graduate Teaching

IGPBS Courses

IGPBS Module 6: BioGraphics (IGPBS 896, 1 hour). The objective of the course is to teach students how to organize and present data in a clear and concise manner at national meetings. Students are taught basic principles of organizing data for presentation and then learn through the actual presentation of data in simulated platform sessions held in the course. Videotapes are made of the presentations, and students are then given a constructive critique of their presentation by the instructor and fellow students.

IGPBS Module 7: Research Rotations (IGPBS 897, 2-4 hours). The course will introduce students to research methods, experimental design, and the types of biomedical research conducted at KUMC. The first research rotation begins halfway through the first semester; the second and third research rotations will occur in the second semester. It is designed to help students determine which faculty member they will select as a research adviser for their doctoral research.

IGPBS Module 8: Introduction to Faculty Research (IGPBS 898, 1 hour). This course was created to provide students with sufficient introduction to the research conducted at KUMC. To facilitate this point, the course is designed as a seminar series. In each session of the series, three faculty members present a brief 20-minute overview of their research programs. The series will help students to select faculty for research rotations and ultimately help them determine which faculty member they will select as a research adviser for their doctoral research.

GSMC 850: Proteins and Metabolism (2 hours). This course is the first of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of metabolism, protein structure and an introduction to nucleic acids.

GSMC 851: Molecular Genetics (2 hours). This course is the second of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of molecular genetics, DNA replication, DNA repair, transcription and translation.

GSMC 852: Introduction to Biomedical Research (2 hours). This is the first semester of a one year series in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The course is composed of weekly meetings to discuss research problems, methods and current literature. The course will interface with the lectures and students will learn to critically evaluate our scientific knowledge base. The students will be introduced to the tools that are available to obtain and evaluate information. The students will be challenged to identify areas of our scientific knowledge that require further experimentation and clarification.

GSMC 853: Cellular Structure (2 hours). This course is the third of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of cellular structure and function. Topics include the lipid bilayer, membrane proteins, and cellular organelles.

GSMC 854: Cell Communication (2 hours). This course is the fourth of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of cell communication. Topics include G-protein-coupled signaling, cellular cytoskeleton; cell cycle control; cell death; extracellular matrix; and cancer.

GSMC 855: Introduction to Biomedical Research II (2 hours). This is the second semester of a one year series in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The course is composed of weekly meetings to discuss research problems, methods and current literature. The course will interface with the lectures and students will learn to critically evaluate our scientific knowledge base. The students will be introduced to the tools that are available to obtain and evaluate information. The students will be challenged to identify areas of our scientific knowledge that require further experimentation and clarification.

GSMC 856: Introduction to Research Ethics (1 hour). The objective of this course is to introduce students to research ethics. Students will learn and discuss some of the following areas of ethics in research: 1) sources of errors in science, 2) Scientific Fraud, 3) plagiarism and misrepresentation, 4) conflicts of interest and 5) confidentiality.

Advanced Graduate Courses

PHSL 834 Reproductive Physiology (5). All aspects of reproductive physiology including an in depth study of ovarian and testicular development/function, neuroendocrine development/function, implantation, placentation, puberty, pregnancy and fertility regulation are covered. Historical and current scientific literature will be used to support a graduate level text and didactic lectures. Prerequisite: a general endocrinology/physiology
course, an equivalent course and/or consent of instructor.

PHSL 835 Integratve Physiology of Exercise (3). To understand how the major physiological systems of the body respond to exercise with an emphasis on integration and function. Historical and current scientific literature will be used to generate discussion and support didactic material. Fundamentals of exercise physiology will be covered, but a background in exercise physiology is not required. Prerequisite: a general physiology course, an equivalent course and/or consent of instructor.

PHSL 838 Advanced Topics (1-3). Special studies designed and arranged on an individual basis to allow a student to pursue a particular subject through reading, special laboratory work, and conferences with a senior staff member.

PHSL 838 Fundamentals of Biomedical Imaging
(3). This is part of the Advanced Topics course (above). This is a multidisciplinary course designed to introduce the students to the fundamentals of existing in vivo and postmortem imaging modalities for anatomy, structure and function in biomedical sciences. Course content covers the physical basis of biomedical image formation and reconstruction; ionizing versus non-ionizing radiation; X-ray imaging; radionuclide PET and SPECT imaging; ultrasound/acoustic imaging; magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy; functional MRI; magnetoencephalography (MEG); optical (including confocal microscope) imaging; infrared imaging; molecular and cellular imaging with contrast agents and special tags or labeling; gene-array imaging and analysis; image-guided interventions; image processing and quantitative analysis and data visualization. Students visit various clinical sites and research labs with state of the art biomedical imaging instrumentations. From these facilities or as invited, speakers who are expert in their fields give lectures in the class.

PHSL 840 Advanced Genetic Analysis (3). This course will focus on principles that underlie genetic analysis, including mutation, complementation, recombination, segregation and regulation. The genetics of commonly used model organisms such as yeast, flies, worms and mice will be examined, classic genetic screens performed to study phage assembly, cell cycle regulation, sex determination and X-chromosome inactivation will be discussed and modern-day techniques used to study inheritance and gene function in various systems will be analyzed. Human genetic analysis will also be covered, including population genetics, techniques for gene mapping, inherited diseases, genetic testing and gene therapy. Through reading and discussion of scientific literature and problem-based homework and exams, students will learn how to evaluate and interpret genetic data as well as develop and design genetic strategies to solve current biological problems. Prerequisite: Completion of IGPBS Core Curriculum or equivalent, or permission of Course Director.

PHSL 842 Comprehensive Human Physiology (5). Advanced course in modern human physiology. The course focuses on organ systems of the human body including nervous, cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive, respiratory, reproductive and urinary systems. This course emphasizes the use of modern experimental experimental approaches that take advantage of cellular and molecular technologies.  Prerequisite: none.

PHSL 844 Neurophysiology (3). In-depth coverage of neural mechanisms of motor control with emphasis on primates. Prerequisite: PHSL 846 or equivalent and consent of instructor.

PHSL 846 Advanced Neuroscience (5). Team taught, in-depth neuroscience course focusing on normal and diseased brain function at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Lectures and discussions will emphasize current issues in neuroscience research. (Same as ANAT 846 and PHCL 846). Prerequisite: Permission of course director.

PHSL 847 Developmental Neurobiology (2). Development of the nervous system from early induction to the development of learning and memory. Topics include: Induction; Cellular Differentiation; Axon growth and Guidance; Target Selection; Cell survival and growth; Synapse formation; Synapse elimination; and Development of Behavior. (Same as ANAT 847 and NURO 847). Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846; PHYS 846; NURO 846) or consent of Instructors.

PHSL 848 Molecular Mechanisms of Neurological Disorders (2). An in-depth coverage of pathogenic mechanisms in neurological diseases: cellular and molecular responses to brain injury and disease, neuroinflammatory diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis), neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases), neurogenetic diseases (e.g., lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders, Down's syndrome and fragile X), trauma, stroke, and viral diseases (e.g., HIV encephalitis). Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846, PHCL 846 or PHSL 846) or an equivalent course and consent of instructor.

PHSL 850 Research (1-10). Original laboratory investigation conducted under the supervision of a senior staff member.

PHSL 851 Seminar (1). Student participation (attendance and presentation) in weekly Departmental seminar series. The topics examined in these seminars are dictated by the interests of students and staff. Prerequisite: students must have passed their oral comprehensive exam.

PHSL 999 Doctoral Dissertation (1-10). Preparation of the Dissertation based on original research and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Credits will be given only after the dissertation has been accepted by the student's dissertation committee.

Last modified: Dec 12, 2013
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