Michael J. Soares, Ph.D.

Director, Institute for Reproductive Health and Regenerative Medicine
University Distinguished Professor
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Ph.D., University of Hawaii, 1981
Postdoctoral, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1981-1983
Postdoctoral, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, 1983-1984


msoares@kumc.edu
Soares Lab web site

Our laboratory investigates specialized survival strategies used by the embryo as it grows within the uterus. Central to the embryo's survival is the formation of an organ derived from the embryo called the placenta. This organ gains access to the maternal blood supply and facilitates the delivery of nutrients to the fetus. We study how early stem cells develop into the placenta. We have learned that the placenta is built in response to cues present in the maternal environment; and diseases of pregnancy, such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction, result when the embryo is not successful in its adaptations to the maternal environment. Inadequate in utero adaptive responses have potentially long-lasting impacts on adult health and disease. For more information on our research, please visit the Soares Lab web site.

Selected Publications

Chakraborty, D., Rumi, M.A.K., Konno, T., and Soares, M.J. (2011) Natural killer cells direct hemochorial placentation by regulating HIF-dependent trophoblast lineage decisions.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A. 108: 16295-16300.

Kent, L.N., Rumi, M.A.K., Kubota, K., Lee, D.-S., and Soares, M.J. (2011) FOSL1 is integral to establishing the maternal-fetal interface.  Molecular and Cellular Biology 31: 4801-4813.

 Soares, M.J., Chakraborty, D., Rumi, M.A.K., Konno, T., and Renaud, S.J. (2012) Rat placentation: an experimental model for investigating the hemochorial maternal-fetal interface.  Placenta 33: 233-243.  [Highlighted on the April 2012 cover of the journal, Placenta]

Chuong, E., Rumi, M.A.K., Soares, M.J., and Baker, J. (2013) Placental endogenous retroviruses facilitate rapid evolution of core trophoblast regulatory network.  Nature Genetics 45: 325-329.

Renaud, S.J., Kubota, K., Rumi, M.A.K., and Soares, M.J. (2014) The FOS transcription factor family differentially controls trophoblast migration and invasion. Journal Biological Chemistry 289:  5025-5039. 

Rumi, M.A.K., Dhakal, P., Kubota, K., Chakraborty, D., Lei, T., Larson, M.A., Wolfe, M.W., Roby, K.F., Vivian, J.L., and Soares, M.J. (2014) Generation of Esr1 knockout rats using zinc finger nuclease-mediated genome editing.  Endocrinology 155: 1991-1999.

Soares, M.J., Chakraborty, D., Kubota, K., Renaud, S.J., and Rumi, M.A.K. (2014) Adaptive mechanisms controlling uterine spiral artery remodeling during the establishment of pregnancy.  International Journal of Developmental Biology 58: 247-259.

Kubota, K., Kent, L.N., Rumi, M.A.K., Roby, K.F., and Soares, M.J. (2015) Dynamic regulation of AP-1 transcriptional complexes directs trophoblast differentiation. Molecular and Cellular Biology 35: 3163-3177.

Renaud, S.J., Chakraborty, D., Mason, C.W., Rumi, M.A.K., Vivian, J.L., and Soares, M.J. (2015) OVO-like 1 regulates progenitor cell fate in human trophoblast development.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A. 112: E6175-E6184.

Dhakal, P., Rumi, M.A.K., Kubota, K., Chakraborty, D., Chien, J., Roby, K.F., and Soares, M.J. (2015) Neonatal progesterone programs adult uterine responses to progesterone and susceptibility to reproductive dysfunction.  Endocrinology 156: 3791-3803.

 

 

Last modified: Jan 28, 2016

Michael J. Soares, Ph.D.

Contact

Michael J. Soares, Ph.D.
Director, Institute for Reproductive Health and Regenerative Medicine
University Distinguished Professor

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