Matthew C. Goering, Ph.D., HCLD

Assistant Professor
Director of Clinical Embryology, Center for Advanced Reproductive Medicine
Deptartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Ph.D., Kansas University School of Medicine, 2010
Research Fellow, Stowers Institute, 2004-2001


Errors in meiotic chromosome segregation occur in as many as one in every four human oocytes, and the frequency and complexity of these errors increases dramatically as a woman ages.   The gain or loss of a chromosome (aneuploidy) is a leading cause of infertility, pregnancy loss and birth defect.  During meiosis, recombination tethers pairs of homologous chromosomes to one another through the formation of crossovers.  These crossovers, together with the cohesin complex and associated proteins, ensure the proper alignment and segregation of chromosomes at the first meiotic division.  In human females, the formation of crossovers occurs during oogenesis in the fetal ovary but does not resolve itself until some 20 to 40 years later when the oocytes are recruited for ovulation during monthly ovulatory cycles.  The primary focus of our research is directed at understanding how ovarian physiology and pathophysiology impact the stability of these recombination intermediates and their associated proteins over time.  Our long-term goal is to identify therapeutic targets or interventions that may preserve fertility and reduce the risk of pregnancy loss arising from aneuploidy.

Selected Publications

Noone S, Camahort R, Bausch C, Goering M, Gerton JL. (2005) Determinants of cohesin localization. Yeast. 22:1011.

Goering M, Lu S, Gard S, Xiong B, McNairn AJ, Jaspersen SL, Gerton JL. (2010) The cohesin acetyltransferase Eco1 promotes DNA damage repair in S. cerevisiae. Cell Cycle. 9:3315-3327.

Last modified: Jun 29, 2017

Contact

Matthew C. Goering, Ph.D., HCLD
Assistant Professor
Director of Clinical Embryology, Center for Advanced Reproductive Medicine

mgoering@kumc.edu

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