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Curriculum Overview, Rotations and Electives

resident in simulated learning

The University of Kansas Family Medicine Residency in Kansas City, KS, is a 9-9-9 academic family medicine residency, training future leaders and teachers. By caring for a diverse, urban and underserved population of all ages, residents learn a progressive, interprofessional, community-minded, and intellectually rigorous approach to medical care. Residents' research projects are guided by experienced researchers.

In addition, our residents practice in continuity clinic with integrated behavioral health staff and ready access to our social worker, chronic care nurse manager, and pharmacist. OB and pediatric patients are seen in the family medicine clinic and community safety net clinics. HIV medicine and buprenorphine training opportunities are offered. Half-day didactics and morning report cases occur weekly.

Rotations and Electives

PGY1

  • Family Medicine Inpatient: 2 blocks
  • Behavioral Science: 1 block
  • Emergency Medicine: 1 block
    The emergency medicine rotation is a four-week block rotation in the emergency room. Residents participate in 16 twelve-hour shifts for a total of 196 hours. These shifts are staggered so the resident has experience in days, evenings, and late nights in the emergency room. Residents are supervised by board certified emergency room physicians in a Level I Trauma Center. They also work with family physicians whose main practice is emergency medicine.
  • Medical Intensive Care Unit: 1 block
    The ICU rotation is a four-week block under the supervision of the critical care faculty. Residents have the same responsibility as the medicine interns and care for an average of five to six critically ill patients every day.
  • Full-Term Nursery: 1 block
    The full-term nursery rotation is a four-week rotation in the newborn nursery at KU. Residents work with pediatrics faculty and residents. They evaluate and care for newborns. Attend high risk deliveries and stabilize infants. They perform a number of circumcisions and care for acute
    illness in the newborn.
  • Internal Medicine: 2 blocks
    The inpatient medicine rotation at the Leavenworth Veterans’ Hospital consists of an eight-week block. Residents work with internal medicine attendings and supervising residents from the internal medicine department. As the remainder of the general medicine inpatient rotations are on the family medicine service, this rotation allows residents to gain experience with the internal medicine approach to patient care.
  • Pediatrics Inpatient: 1 block
    Residents rotate for four-weeks on the inpatient service at Children’s Mercy Hospital. Here the residents serve as pediatrics interns. This is an arduous service. Residents carry an average of six or seven children daily.
  • Surgery: 1 block
    The first year general surgery rotation is a four week experience working with the general surgery residents and attendings at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Leavenworth, KS. This rotation includes inpatient and outpatient experiences, assisting on major surgery, minor operating room experience, didactic sessions, and significant experience in caring for pre- and post-operative patients.
  • Obstetrics: 1 block
    The obstetrics rotation is a four-week rotation with the Obstetrics Department at the University of Kansas Hospital. Residents rotate with the obstetrics residents on the labor and delivery ward where they learn the principles of management of labor and delivery and post-partum care. They also participate twice weekly with the faculty in the high-risk clinic.
  • Resident Development: 1/2 block
    PGY1s will be given time to acclimate to our health system. They will spend time in clinic, on our inpatient service and participating in other facets of our health system to full prepare residents before going out on rotations. Part of this time involves didactic sessions specifically for PGY1s, learning about the community we serve in Kansas City, KS, meeting with EMR specialists to start off with EMR efficiency and working with our other clinic team members to understand everyone's roles.
  • Holiday Intercession: 1/2 block

PGY2

  • Family Medicine Inpatient: 2 blocks
  • Family Medicine Inpatient Night Float: 1/2 block
    This rotation is two separate two week blocks and takes place in the University of Kansas Hospital. The residents care for the family medicine inpatients from 6:30 pm to 7:00 am. They check out with the inpatient team at 6:30 pm and at 6:30 am. They admit patients overnight from the emergency department, care for all patients on the family medicine service previously admitted to the hospital, and assess obstetric patients that present to labor and delivery. In addition, they take calls from the answering service. On Friday morning, they complete their family medicine continuity clinic.
  • Obstetrics: 1 block
    The second-year obstetrics rotation is at Ft. Riley adjacent to Junction City, KS. This is a one four-week away rotation. Residents work directly with the obstetrics faculty and nurse midwives to assess and manage labor and delivery and its complications.
  • Gynecology: 1 block
    The gynecology rotation is a four-week rotation with faculty in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at KU. Residents work in the outpatient and community setting and have some experience in the surgical suite.
  • Ambulatory Pediatrics: 1 block
    This is a four-week block rotation and takes place in the pediatrics outpatient clinic at KU. Residents are supervised by pediatrics faculty and work with pediatrics residents in the clinic.
  • Pediatrics Emergency Medicine: 1 block
  • Cardiology: 1 block
    The resident will rotate for four weeks in the cardiology department at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Residents will work with board-certified staff cardiologists seeing outpatient and inpatient consultations. Whenever possible, the resident will see the patient first and present the case to the cardiologist, then see the patient along with the cardiologist. The staff cardiologist will teach and mentor the resident regarding the topics listed above. The resident is encouraged to assist in the cardiac catheterization lab at least once during the course of the rotation.
  • Practice Management: 1 block
  • Musculoskeletal Medicine: 1 block
    Residents rotate with faculty in various areas of orthopedic surgery. This rotation allows residents to see generalist orthopods and those who specialize in specific areas of the body (i.e. foot and ankle, back, and hand) and those who specialize in certain disorders like oncology. Residents spend 25 hours a week or 100 hours on the orthopedics rotation. This experience is augmented by a similar rotation in sports medicine and workshops, didactics, and recurring didactics in musculoskeletal and sports medicine.
  • Career-Focused Elective: 1 block
  • Resident Development: 1 block
    Residents meet together by class to engage in longitudinal curriculum, such as research, health systems management, and quality improvement. Residents participate in classroom activities and simulations to improve clinical skills such as; advanced suturing, treadmills, ambulatory procedures training, teaching skills and leadership training. It’s used as a time to “recharge” with your classmates. No call responsibilities.
  • Holiday Intercession: 1/2 block

PGY3

  • Supervisor Family Medicine Inpatient: 1 1/2 blocks
    Residents supervise the inpatient service for a total of 6 weeks over two separate rotations in their third year. During this time, the residents are responsible for the care of all patients on the inpatient service. They must also supervise and teach the junior residents.
  • Family Medicine Night Float: 1/2 block
    This rotation is two separate two week blocks and takes place in the University of Kansas Hospital. The residents care for the family medicine inpatients from 6:30 pm to 7:00 am. They check out with the inpatient team at 6:30 pm and at 6:30 am. They admit patients overnight from the emergency department, care for all patients on the family medicine service previously admitted to the hospital, and assess obstetric patients that present to labor and delivery. In addition, they take calls from the answering service. On Friday morning, they complete their family medicine continuity clinic.
  • Sports Medicine: 1 block
    Residents participate in a four-week elective consisting of 25 hours per week (total 100 hours) of sports medicine. This experience consists of working with an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine and with a family practitioner who works with the orthopedist to treat non surgical sports injuries. Residents are encouraged to participate in community sports venues such as assisting the team doctor at high school football games.
  • Geriatrics: 1 block
    Residents are part of an extensive geriatric curriculum developed by the division of geriatrics and administered under a Reynold’s Grant. They have monthly geriatric journal club. There is a geriatric module presented quarterly and this is accompanied by a pre- and post-test. The residents care for a large number of geriatric patients in the clinic and in the hospital. They also have a continuity panel of nursing home patients.
  • Career-Focused Elective: 3 blocks
  • Urology: 1/2 block
    The urology rotation is a one-month rotation with a private urologist in Manhattan, KS. The residents spend the majority of their time in the outpatient setting learning the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of various urological conditions encountered in primary care. They are also exposed to inpatient urology and understand urological procedures and the types of conditions that require referral.
  • Emergency Medicine: 1 block
  • Ambulatory Pediatrics: 1 block
  • Community Medicine/Public Health: 1 block
  • Resident Development: 1 block
    Residents meet together by class to engage in longitudinal curriculum, such as research, health systems management, and quality improvement. Residents participate in classroom activities and simulations to improve clinical skills such as; advanced suturing, treadmills, ambulatory procedures training, teaching skills and leadership training. It’s used as a time to “recharge” with your classmates. No call responsibilities.
  • Holiday Intercession: 1/2 block

Electives

  • Addiction Psychiatry
  • Anesthesiology
  • Child Psychiatry
  • Cray Diabetes
  • Dermatology
  • Endocrinology
  • Ethics
  • Hospice/Palliative
  • Interprofessional Teaching Clinic (IPTC)
  • Obstetrics
  • Ophthalmology
  • Pain Management
  • Patient Centered Medical Home
  • Research
  • SICU/Trauma
  • Sleep Medicine
  • Surgery 
  • Urgent Care
  • Wound Care

Didactic Sessions

Morning Report

Morning Report is a case-based presentation led by our residents every Wednesday morning from 7:30-8:00 am. The residents present cases from their inpatient experience that are complex or interesting or sometimes rare diagnoses. The presentations are interactive with involvement from residents AND faculty. The audience is asked to list differentials, discuss work up, narrow the differential and review management.

Core

Every Wednesday afternoon from 1-4 pm the family medicine residents have protected didactic time, called "Core." The afternoons feature family medicine faculty and invited guest lectures, interactive workshops, journal review, geriatric medicine, OB Chart Review, Patient Safety & Quality cases, practice management topics, and resident wellness tools. Every other month the residents have dedicated time for research. Residents also go to a local high school to do sports physicals in the summer, fall and spring during this time. The residents complete their Knowledge Self Assessments (KSAs) required by the American Board of Family Medicine as a group on two Wednesday afternoons a year. A 70% attendance of Core is required.

Last modified: Nov 17, 2020
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