Doctors as Educators

Doctors as Educators

The University of Kansas School of Medicine Faculty Development Program, organized out of the Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development office, is an established leader in faculty development for medical educators. Since 2006, when our Educator's Breakfast Series began, over 600 faculty and fellows from The University of Kansas School of Medicine as well as School of Nursing and School of Health Professionals have participated in the in our programs. The professional development of participants is supported through the use of adult learning methods and collaborative learning. Courses, programs and continuing education credits are provided for the members of the School of Medicine faculty at no charge. Registration is required and acceptance into courses is a requirement for participation.

Fall 2014

Doctors as Educators (DAE) Series

Erica Howe, M.D., Course Director

Thirteen consecutive Mondays
August 18 2014 through November 24, 2014
Noon – 1 p.m. (lunch provided) 
KUMC Campus


green bulletRegistration is closed for the fall session. 


Course Description

The Doctors As Educators (DAE) Program is a 14 session course focusing on teaching doctors the theory and skills required to become excellent teachers in medical education. All current University of Kansas faculty (clinical and basic science) are invited to attend.

Overall Course Objectives:

  • Identify the current guidelines in the medical literature regarding the skills required to excel as a clinical educator.
  • Learn the latest innovations in teaching in medical education.
  • Describe and exemplify the use of "advanced organizers" in medical education.
  • Reflect on past teaching experiences and participate in small-group discussions about successful and unsuccessful teaching moments.

Schedule

Download the Doctors as Educators course schedule as a PDF.

Session Date Topic

1

Aug. 18, 2014

What Makes an Excellent Teacher? Erica Howe, M.D.

2

Aug. 25, 2014

Teaching Clinical Reasoning: Advanced Organizers and the Socratic Method, Erica Howe, M.D.

Sept. 1, 2014

Labor Day, no class scheduled

3

Sept. 8, 2014

Setting Goals and Expectations, Erica Howe, M.D.

4

Sept. 15, 2014

Time Management, Julie Christianson, M.D.

5

Sept. 22, 2014

Teaching Methods: How to Give a Great Talk vs. Death by Lecture, Erica Howe, M.D.

6

Sept. 29, 2014

Learning Theories and Role Modeling, Erica Howe, M.D.

7

Oct. 6, 2014

Motivating Your Learners, Erica Howe, M.D.

8

Oct. 13, 2014

The Difficult Learner and Control of the Session, Erica Howe, M.D.

9

Oct. 20, 2014

Giving Feedback, Brad Barth, M.D.

10

Oct. 27, 2014

Conflict Management and Negotiation: Learning the Styles, Erica Howe, M.D.

11

Nov. 3, 2014

Conflict Management and Negotiation: Doing It Better, Erica Howe, M.D.

12

Nov. 10, 2014

Assessing if Learning is Taking Place, Erica Howe, M.D.

13

Nov. 17, 2014

Making Teachers Out of Learners, Angela Mayorga, M.D.

 

Bio for Erica Howe, M.D., Course Director

Dr. Howe graduated from the University of Utah School of Medicine prior to completing her residency in Internal Medicine at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. After graduating from Tulane in 2007, she completed a year as chief resident. Her first faculty position was at Johns Hopkins Bayview in Baltimore where she practiced as an academic Hospitalist for three years before coming to Kansas City. While at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Howe developed various curriculums for Internal Medicine residents and medical students at Johns Hopkins University. Her interest in medical education continued when she moved to Kansas City and was hired as an academic Hospitalist at the University of Kansas and appointed as a Core Faculty for the Internal Medicine Residency Program in 2011.

In the spring of 2012, she introduced a faculty development series titled Doctors as Educators to the faculty at KU. This course focuses on teaching junior faculty how to improve their clinical teaching through active learning principles that include discussion of the theories of learning, teaching methods, teaching clinical reasoning, motivating the learner, addressing the difficult learner, conflict management and negotiation, giving feedback, setting expectations, and time management, among others.

Her endeavors in teaching and academic medicine have been recognized with numerous awards and honors.  In 2013, Dr. Howe was elected as the only M.D. at the University of Kansas Medical Center to receive a Women in Medicine Scholarship to attend the American Association of Medical College's Women's Early-Career Professional Development Seminar.  She was also one of five finalists school wide for the Rainbow Award in 2013, a medical student-elected award to recognize "teaching the art of medicine by example."


Session Objectives and Descriptions

What Makes an Excellent Teacher?
Speaker: Erica Howe, M.D.

This session will clarify the process by which a clinical educator evolves from learner to teacher to clinically excellent teacher.  This session will also educate the clinical educator on the characteristics that constitute an excellent teacher, as defined by a variety of learners in the current medical literature. 
Objectives:

  • To discuss the barriers to teaching excellence and ways to overcome them
  • To reflect on the qualities that comprise excellent teachers
  • To learn how the medical literature defines teaching excellence
  • To explore how excellent teachers develop professionally

Strategies:

  • Reflect on the qualities that the learners in medical education value most.
  • Adjust my teaching to include a combination of “curriculum scripts” and improvisation.
  • Routinely use personal reflection to enhance my teaching skills.

Teaching Clinical Reasoning: Advanced Organizers and the Socratic Method

Speaker: Erica Howe, M.D.

This session will introduce the clinical educator to the concept of clinical coaching, an approach to teaching in medicine that emphasizes use of the Socratic Method to teach new information and the use of advanced organizers to solidify new or difficult concepts for learners.

Objectives:

  • To recognize the four components of preparing to be an effective “coach” in medical education.
  • To be able to identify the ways in which “pimping” differs from the Socratic Method of teaching.
  • To define and be able to divide medical education coaching into its three main parts and acknowledge the importance of each aspect.

Strategies:

  • Routinely use motivation, visualization, anticipation and choosing content with utility to prepare to teach my learners to reasoning clinically.
  • Incorporate the Socratic method of dialogue in teaching my learners.
  • Incorporate Advanced Organizers as visual aids to solidify my teaching points.
“Check on learning” by asking more advanced learners to teach, applying the content to a new data set, and applying the content to a different clinical or research scenario.

Setting Goals and Expectations 
Speaker: Erica Howe, M.D.

Learners often express frustration at not knowing what is expected of them, especially in the modern-day setting of frequent shift changes and rotations of attendings.  This session will aim to educate the clinical educator on the importance of clarifying goals and expectations with learners upfront.  We will also explore the definition of a hidden curriculum and how its presence can hinder your teaching.

Objectives:

  • To define the clinical educator’s personal expectations of their learners and to understand the importance of verbalizing these expectations to improve the learning environment.
  • To define and evaluate how to remove the hidden curriculum from your teaching.

Strategies:

  • Routinely discuss my personal expectations for learners at the beginning of each course or rotation.
  • Routinely request that my learners clarify what their goals and expectations for me at the beginning of each course or rotation.
  • Acknowledge the hidden curriculum in medicine and actively attempt to prevent its negative effects on my learners.

Time Management: Making Yours and Everyone's Around You More Efficient
Speaker: Julie Christianson, Ph.D.


Inefficient time management is one of the biggest barriers to daily teaching on the wards and in clinic.  
This session will aim to discuss ways in which the clinical educator can be more efficient with the limited amount of time available in their day to allow for more efficient and timely teaching sessions.

Objectives:

  • To discuss the common time management challenges encountered as a teacher in medical education.
  • To explore how to "frame" the clinical day using the concepts of the 3 "D"s, urgent vs. important patient care prioritization, and time windows to allow for more teaching.
  • To provide the clinical educator with models for short, timely teaching sessions in the context of a demanding clinical day.

Strategies:

  • Routinely use strategies like the 3 "D"s, urgent vs. important prioritization, and time windows to model time efficiency and improve my daily time management.
  • Attempt to model efficiency by structuring the day with my clinical or research team, and bundling my teaching with patient care or research duties.

Teaching Methods: How to Give a Great Talk vs. Death by Lecture
Speaker: Erica Howe, M.D.

This session will explore the benefits of the most common teaching structures for learners in the medical setting, with a focus on lecture and small group discussions.  The most frequent mistakes when using each teaching structure will be identified along with ways to avoid these pitfalls.

Objectives:

  • To be able to discuss the pros and cons associated with the most common teaching methods in medical education.
  • To be able to list the top ten rules for fighting lecture fatigue and leading small group discussions, including the ‘triple tell” and “rule of six”.
  • Explore five main questions in determining the most appropriate teaching method for the medical educator’s topic and learners.

Strategies:

  • Attempt to use a combination of teaching methods in my teaching presentations to better solidify the information being taught for my learners.
  • Routinely use the top ten rules for creating a successful small group discussion.
  • Routinely use the top ten rules for preventing lecture fatigue when giving a power point presentation.
  • Reflect regularly on the five main questions in determining the most appropriate teaching method for the topic and learners I am teaching.

Learning Theories and Role Modeling
Speaker: Erica Howe, M.D.

This session focuses on discussion of the five main theories behind how adult learners assimilate knowledge, skills, and attitudes.  This presentation will also discuss how these theories are intertwined with role modeling.  Common themes associated with being an excellent role model will also be explored.

Objectives:

  • To reflect on personal role modeling experiences and what made them positive or negative.
  • To learn the five main learning theories and how this relates to learners in medicine.
  • To identify the 5 “Be”s for excelling as a role model and how each relates to a learning theory.

Strategies:

  • Routinely use the five main themes for excelling as a role model during patient interactions: acknowledging the power of non-verbal cues and shows of respect, addressing feelings, building a personal connection, and self-reflection.
  • Routinely use active reflection to encourage conscious behavior changes in my learners.
  • Watch for a negative interaction and acknowledge when you were not your “best self” in the presence of learners.
  • Routinely use the five “Be”s to excel as a role model: be polite, be paranoid, be explicit, be encouraging, and be reflective.

Motivating the Learner
Speaker: Erica Howe, M.D.

This session will investigate Maslow’s Hierarchy as it relates to motivation and how the clinical educator can enhance learner motivation using a variety of tools and principles in the clinical setting.

Objectives:

  • To discuss the history of adult learning theories and how they can be applied to motivation in teaching.
  • To investigate the three main causes of lack of motivation and how to address each.
  • To learn about the eight “C’s” of motivation and how they can be applied to the learners of medical education.

Strategies:

  • Use the “SMORES” acronym (Specific, Meaningful, Observable, Realistic, Effortful, Small) to improve motivation in my teaching.
  • Evaluate environmental and learner currencies to improve motivation in my classroom.
  • Explore the three main learner barriers that decrease motivation in the classroom and ways to overcome them.
  • Use the five tips for sustaining motivation over time (goals, habits and rituals, acknowledgement, traditions, “the bible”).
  • Use the eight “C’s” of motivation to improve educational investments by my learners.

The Difficult Learner and Control of the Session
Speaker: Erica Howe, M.D.

The difficult learner is often seen as the great nemesis of an effective teacher.  This session will provide the clinical educator with tools to help them identify the types of difficult learners and methods for diagnosing and managing their behavior.

Objectives:

  • To be able to identify the types of difficult learners and the underlying deficit.
  • To be able to discuss time-based management of the difficult learner—acute, subacute, and chronic.

Strategies:

  • Routinely use the characteristics described in this session to identify the type of difficult learner.
  • Routinely use the nine “In-The-Moment” tips for acute management of the difficult learner.
  • Use the seven steps for sub-acute management of the difficult learner.

Giving Feedback
Speaker: Brad Barth, M.D.


Poor feedback can quickly discourage a novice learner and have a negative effect on future performance, whereas effective feedback can act to motivate and improve learner performance.   This session will aim to teach the skills needed to overcome common challenges to effective feedback and provide strategies for improving how feedback is delivered.

Objectives:

  • To be able to identify and explore effective methods of giving feedback.
  • To understand the barriers to providing effective feedback and how to overcome them.
  • To investigate how awareness of the "intrapersonal" and "interpersonal" improves delivery of feedback in the context of a relationship.
  • To develop your own strategy of providing effective feedback.

Strategies:

  • Choose an appropriate method to provide feedback.
  • Routinely use an approach to successful feedback (i.e. Set the scene, ask for self-reflection, add your observations, blend observed behaviors with curricular objectives, ask for self-reflection on observations, develop specific goals for improvement and subsequent feedback).Routinely avoid common feedback pitfalls discussed in this session.

Conflict Management and Negotiation: Learning the Styles
Speaker: Erica Howe, M.D.

Modern theories embrace the concept that conflict is a natural part of frequent interactions with others.  This session discusses why conflicts arise and the five main negotiation styles associated with managing these conflicts while maintaining an effective relationship with the other party.

Objectives:

  • To discuss the challenges of working as a team and managing conflict
  • To define the 5 types of negotiation styles and pros and cons of each
  • To be able to identify the type of negotiation you are and how to identify the type of negotiator with whom you are interacting.

Strategies:

  • Reflect on my preferred negotiation style and how this style can navigate conflicts successfully when interacting with others.
  • Routinely attempt to use the most effective negotiation style for the conflict at hand, even if this differs from my personal negotiation preference.
  • Balance my “need to win” with the need to maintain and build a relationship with my co-negotiator.

Conflict Management and Negotiation: Doing It Better
Speaker: Erica Howe, M.D.

This session focuses on a number of tools to help the learner maneuver through a difficult conversation when emotions are high and much is at stake. This session will explore the “prep work” needed to help ensure a difficult conversation is successful, as well as language to use to prevent damaging important relationships when a sensitive topic needed to be addressed.

Objectives:

  • To learn how to recognize when a crucial conversation is taking place.
  • To discover how to make others feel safe contributing to the dialogue.
  • To use the “Path to Action” to master the stories we tell ourselves in difficult conversations.
  • To maneuver when a sensitive topic needs to be addressed.
  • To learn how to get others out of their “emotional basements” and what to do when you cannot.

Strategies:

  • Routinely use the “path to action” to evaluate the stories we tell ourselves in difficult conversations.
  • Use the “AAMP” acronym (Ask about their stories, Mirror, Paraphrase, and Prime) to get others “out of their emotional basement” prior to negotiating.
  • Make it safe for others to contribute to the dialogue by using contrasting statements (“Don’t” statement, then Do statement) and committing to seek mutual purpose.
  • Discuss sensitive topics using the “STATE your view” acronym (Share your facts, Tell you story, Ask for others’ paths, Talk tentatively, Encourage testing).

Assessing if Learning is Taking Place
Speaker: Erica Howe, M.D.

This session will discuss the variety of assessment tools available to faculty and how these tools can be modified to meet the needs of different teaching sessions. The ways in which learner-based assessments can improve teaching in the classroom and clinical setting will also be explored.

  • To explore the benefits of various forms of assessment.
  • To clarify the differences between goals and objectives.
  • To identify the appropriate assessment tool to evaluate your teaching sessions.
  • To investigate the pros and cons of in-the-moment vs. over-time assessment tools.

Strategies:

  • Perform a three-question pre-assessment evaluation of the learning currently taking place in my teaching sessions (What are the students actually learning right now?  What do I want them to learn?  How can I bridge the gap?).
  • Create/revise broad goals and specific objectives to better assess my teaching sessions.
  • Analyze and modify the current assessment tools being used to evaluate my teaching sessions to better analyze the learning taking place.

Making Teachers Out of Learners

Speaker: Angela Mayorga, M.D.

This session will focus on giving the clinical educator the tools needed to help them transition their advanced learners into the role of teacher.  This class will explore the characteristics of advanced learners as they prepare for this transition, along with tips to make introducing a learner to the role of teacher effective and seamless.

Objectives:

  • To discuss the developmental differences as learners grow from novice to advanced and what characteristics are most consistent with a learner who is ready to teach.
  • To investigate specific guidelines on how the clinical educator can best aid their advanced learners as they transition to the role of teacher.

Strategies:

  • Routinely practice the concepts of dualism, multiplicity, and relativism in helping the learner transition into the role of teacher.

Use the seven tips for “teaching teaching” to advanced learners.


Sponsored by

University of Kansas Department of Internal Medicine, KU School of Medicine Faculty Affairs and Faculty Development and University of Kansas Medical Center Continuing Education.

Education Scholar Certificates

Education Scholar certificates for faculty learners can be earned by:

  1. Attendance at 75 percent or more of the Doctors As Educators (DAE) sessions
  2. Creation and teaching of an advanced organizer concept to faculty learners during the DAE course

Continuing Medical Education Credit

Accreditation Statement

The University of Kansas Medical Center Office of Continuing Medical Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Kansas Medical Center Office of Continuing Medical Education designates this live activity for a maximum of 13.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Credit Designation Statement

The University of Kansas Medical Center Office of Continuing Medical Education designates this educational activity, Doctors as Educators (DAE) Course Part I, for a maximum of 13 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM . Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Policy on Speaker and Provider Disclosure

It is the policy of the University of Kansas Medical Center Office of Continuing Medical Education that the speaker and provider disclose real or apparent conflicts of interest relating to the topics of this educational activity, and also disclose discussions of unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices during their presentation(s). The University of Kansas Medical Center Office of Continuing Medical Education has established policies in place that will identify and resolve all conflicts of interest prior to this educational activity. Detailed disclosure will be made in the activity handout materials.

Planning Committee

  • Erica Howe, MD, Course Director and Assistant Professor, General and Geriatric Medicine, Educational Services Director and one of the Core Faculty Advisors in Internal Medicine
  • Anne Walling, MB, ChB, FFPHM, Associate Dean for Faculty Development - Wichita
  • Andrea Shaw, Director, Office of Continuing Education, KUMC

Contact Information and Questions

Erica Howe, MD, Course Director
ehowe@kumc.edu

Last modified: Aug 21, 2014
Testimonials

Praise from previous Doctors as Educators Course:

"Dr. Howe brought the idea to form a faculty development course on teaching excellence with her from her time at Johns Hopkins. During her first year at KU, she performed a needs assessment and found that there was a strong desire for more formalized training by her colleagues in this area. She took the initiative to use her prior training and experience in teaching excellence and curriculum development to create this comprehensive course on how to excel as an educator in medicine. The Doctors as Educators course encourages the principle of lifelong learning in our faculty and improves the value of classroom and clinical teaching for all learners taught by the faculty that attend this course. I strongly encourage our Chairs to support any faculty who seek to expand their knowledge of pedagogy through this course."
-- Gary Doolittle, M.D., Professor and Vice Chair of Education, Department of Internal Medicine


"Overall, the course was outstanding . I found it very rewarding and practical/pertinent to our daily interactions with our learners. The interactive mode of the presenters with the audience was refreshing!"
-- Abebe Abebe, M.D.


"Attending the Doctors As Educators course was well worth the time investment, as it gave me tools I could immediately put into practice in my teaching activities. The course content itself, as well as the input from the other participants, continue to prove to be valuable to my work as an educator."
-- Emily Riegel, M.D.


"Creating my own advanced organizer and presenting it to my peers gave me the opportunity to practice creating a teaching tool and to get useful feedback from my colleagues."
-- Ann Pizzi, M.D.


"This course was excellent! Both the group discussions and the more formal presentations were very useful. This is an area of education under-represented in physician training and one that is key in the development of exceptional physician educators."
-- Becky Lowry, M.D.


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