Preceptor Resources

Welcome to Strategies in Clinical Teaching, a Resource for Community Based Faculty

Thank you for serving the University of Kansas School of Medicine by providing valuable community clinical experiences for our students and other learners.

Background
This site provides mini-modules on common teaching strategies, each designed to provide practical information on teaching in the community setting.  Because the focus is on "community faculty," we will use this term and "preceptor" or "supervisor" interchangeably throughout the site. We will also use "medical student", "student", and "learner" interchangeably though the resources apply to a variety of clinical settings, clinical instructors, and learners. The education of our students depends on your expertise and enthusiasm for teaching. There is no single "best way" to teach medical students; the best clinical teachers use a variety of techniques. Students are adult learners so your role is more similar to coaching than traditional classroom teaching. Most teaching skills are similar or identical to skills required for patient care so you are already a skilled clinical teacher.  And, as a "coach," you can draw on both positive and negative experiences in your own education.  

Orienting Students: Getting off to a good start prevents most problems!
One Minute Preceptor: An established approach to clinical teaching that is both efficient and effective.
Active Observation: How to apply your keen patient observation skills to students
Assessing Students: The basics of formative assessment (feedback throughout the rotation) and summative assessment (end-of-rotation) and how to make them easier for you and more beneficial for your students.
Bedside Teaching: Link to resources to make the most of this time-honored method of clinical instruction
Giving Short Talks on the Run: Ideas to offer just-in-time mini-lectures of 5 minutes or less.
Preceptor Pearls: Brief reference materials on a wide range of topics including primers on evidence-based medicine, motivational interviewing and other communication skills.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Community-Based Teaching: Some of the most common questions about teaching are addressed on the site in our FAQ but please let us know how we can help make teaching as effective, efficient, and enjoyable as possible for you.
Bibliography

We update this site regularly. Please send comments and suggestions on the site or other aspects of teaching at KU School of Medicine to smoser@kumc.edu.

Acknowledgements Thanks to Dr. Anne Walling, Dr. Brent Beasley, Dr. Scott Moser and others for starting this site in 2003 through a Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant.

Thanks to Dr. Nancy Davis and Teresa Beacham for editing and website development and Dr. Pam Shaw for editing.

Last modified: Jul 11, 2017
ID=x29223