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Teaching

The Landon Center on Aging serves as the coordinating body for undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate education in geriatrics and the care of older adult patients.

After sponsoring a required clerkship in Geriatric Medicine for 34 years, the School of Medicine underwent a radical curriculum change in 2018. There is now a stronger focus on team-based active learning and the integration of identified critical content as "threads" throughout the curriculum rather than as stand-alone clerkships. Geriatric Medicine was named one of these nine threads, resulting in the ability to teach students at multiple times throughout all four years of their training. Education is offered via flipped classrooms, case-based learning activities, and problem-based learning, in addition to eight simulations focused on care of the older adult. In the clinical years, geriatrics content is taught in the classroom setting as a required part of their clinical rotations and in the patient-care setting by board-certified Geriatric Medicine physicians.

Training for the residents in Internal Medicine and Family Medicine occurs in a variety of settings well. The residents accompany Geriatricians in their primary care geriatrics clinics, their consultative inter-professional assessment clinics, skilled nursing facilities, long term care facilities, and even on home visits. They also participate in didactic teaching over the course of their training to include both large and small group discussions related to key topics in care of the older adult.

The Geriatric Medicine physicians partner with the fellowship in Palliative Medicine and Vascular Neurology to provide education in the long-term care setting and in the classroom setting.

Last modified: Mar 07, 2019
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