Program Overview

General Design of the Graduate Curriculum

The curriculum is divided into three cores: informatics, leadership, and research.  In addition, each student selects a discipline on which to focus: clinical, health policy & management, or public health. Many of the courses are online. Faculty advisors are assigned based on the career goals of the student. The student and advisor will develop a plan of study that meets the career goals of the student. All IPHI courses are required. With the approval of your advisor, some courses may be substituted for the discipline specific courses.

View the course schedule and delivery method (i.e. online or in-person delivery).

Informatics students use computers in a variety of ways, including Second Life simulations. Click here for requirements.

Online Application

Courses

Health Informatics Core (17 credits)

All of the Health Informatics Core courses are required.

IPHI 850 Introduction to Health Informatics (2-3)

This course will provide an overview of health informatics focused on five themes: health informatics foundations; clinical decision support; human factors/organization factors; public health informatics and current issues in health informatics including best practices. Students enrolled for 3 credits will develop and demonstrate a practical, innovative small-group information technology (IT) project from one of a set of faculty recommended projects or from a student-proposed idea. PREREQUISITE(S): None. (Previous or simultaneous enrollment in Health Data Theory and Practice is recommended)

IPHI 851 Transforming of Health Care through Use of Information Systems and Technology (3)

The application of the information system development life cycle in the design, selection, and implementation of health information technology applications will be examined. Human computer interactions and emerging technologies will be explored for their impact on patient care and safety. The role of legal, regulatory, ethical and security issues will be discussed as they apply to clinical and consumer information technologies. PREREQUISITE(S): None.

IPHI 852 Health Data: Theory and Practice (3-4) (Includes 3 credit hour didactic course, 1 credit hour optional lab)

Principles of database theory, modeling, design and manipulation will be introduced. Students will have experience using a relational database management system. Database manipulation will be explored by composing and executing query statements and critically evaluating the results.

IPHI 853 Abstraction and Modeling of Health Care Information (3)

The information system development life cycle process is presented with emphasis on determination and analysis of information system requirements and system design that meet the identified health care information requirements. Object-oriented techniques will be introduced, including Unified Modeling Language and Unified Modeling Methodology, to facilitate process analysis and design proposal development. PREREQUISITE(S): NRSG 820 or consent of instructor.

IPHI 854 Knowledge Management in Health Care (3)

Knowledge management is the creation, communication, and leveraging of a healthcare organization's knowledge assets. Defining knowledge, describing the knowledge creation cycle, and the identification of the knowledge worker and his/her impact on the organization are discussed. Information technology and communities of practice are presented in a balanced approach supporting a systematic viewpoint of the knowledge management process. Knowledge management theory is enhanced with the performance of a knowledge audit and the development of knowledge management tools. PREREQUISISTE(S):NRSG 820.

IPHI 856 Health Informatics Practicum (1-3)

In collaboration with health care informatics faculty, preceptors, students design an experience to facilitate application of theories and research related to health informatics. Emphasis is on the application of the information system development life cycle. Students analyze the leadership and technical behaviors of various informatics roles and negotiate an informatics project to be completed within the practicum.  Three credit hours of practicum are required.  These hours may be taken over 1-3 consecutive semesters.  Students must be enrolled in at least 1 credit hour of practicum during their last semester.  PREREQUISITE(S): All Informatics Courses, the Common Core, the Leadership Core, or consent of instructor.

Leadership Core (9 credits)

The following courses qualify for credit toward the Leadership core requirement. You must take one course about health policy.  There is a choice of two courses that meet this requirement.

NRSG 808 The Social Context for Health Care Policy (2)

Using a local/single clinical issue students examine ways to abstract this issue into a social policy context. Local examples are used throughout the course to demonstrate the leadership and structural systems required to effect change in policy. Strategies to identify constituencies and build coalitions are studied. PREREQUISITE(S)/CO-REQUISITE(S): NRSG 755, NRSG 880, or consent of instructor.

Or

HP&M 837 Health Policy (3)

This course examines the development, implementation, and evaluation of federal, state, and local health policy in the United States. Particular attention will be given to (1) the development of public institutions and policy goals; and (2) current policy problems such as cost controls, reimbursement, health services utilization, program assessment and evaluation, public health, and public/private investment and resource planning. Students will be expected to synthesize and integrate knowledge to apply theory and principles in ways consistent with professional practice as a health policy analyst.

NRSG 820 Program, Project, and Communication Planning (2)

Strategies to promote program, project, and communication planning are presented and applied by the student.  Communication strategies for informing, guiding, and persuading clients, health care providers, payers, and other stakeholders to advance program and project development are discussed.   The use of evolving information technologies to improve program, project and communication planning is emphasized.

HP&M 832 Governance and Health Law (2)

A survey course of the law as it affects governance, health care administration and health care generally. This course will develop the student's understanding of health law and its impact on many aspects of health care governance and administration.  The student should be able to identify and understand various legal issues they may encounter and when to engage legal counsel's advice.  PREREQUISITE: HP&M 810

HP&M 833 Ethics (2)

An introduction to the principles and concepts in the ethics of health services administration. The course will help students further develop their skills to recognize and analyze ethical dilemmas, and to explain, justify and evaluate the decisions they make in response to such dilemmas.

NRSG 880 / HP&M 840 Organizational Foundations for Leading Change (3)

Leadership concepts are advanced and an orientation to organizational structures and dynamics in healthcare are introduced. Learners examine linear and non-linear mental models and analyze the social determinants that influence a service organization's capacity for change. Political, legal, and ethical influences and interventions that reverse constraints and destabilized functions, or advance and strengthen the organizational mission are explored.  PREREQUISITE: NRSG 748 OR NRSG 755

NRSG 882 / HP&M 850 Introduction to Operations (3)

Examines performance of health care organizations, sources of variation, methods of measurement, and strategies for improving performance. Considers several approaches to performance improvement and examines tools widely used in operations management. Incorporates lecture, discussion, and fieldwork.

NRSG 885 Evaluation and Analysis for Health Care Effectiveness (2)

Systematic approaches for analyzing and evaluating processes of care delivery and their impact on client populations, organizational processes, and communities are considered. Research concepts and methods are used in a systems context. Program evaluation, performance improvement, and other methods of measuring outcomes are examined for their utility within the health care setting. Linkages between program evaluation and regulatory policy are studied. PREREQUISITE(S): NRSG 754. CO-REQUISITE(S): NRSG 880 or consent of instructor.

Research Core (5 credits)

One research course and the research project are required.

NRSG 754 Healthcare Research (3)

Methods of critiquing and conducting research and evaluating research findings for use in practice are explored. Research that focuses on health risks of client systems, practice guidelines, therapeutic management, and on cost and outcomes will be examined. Emphasis is placed on generating research questions from theory and practice. PREREQUISITE: one course in graduate statistics.

Or

HP&M 819 Research for Health Care Leaders (3)

Introduces epidemiology, survey research, and evaluation research.  Examines quantitative and qualitative methods.  Focuses on the role of research in health policy and health management.  Incorporates lecture, discussion, papers and presentations.  PREREQUISITE: one course in graduate statistics

IPHI 860 Health Informatics Research Project (2)

Students will perform an independent research project and produce a report, designed artifact, or other appropriate deliverable formatted for public defense. PREREQUISITE(S): NRSG 754 or HP&M 819. Project guidelines.

Discipline Specific Courses (9 credits)

Below are examples from the three discipline options. You and your advisor will determine which courses are to be taken.

- Clinical Discipline - 

NRSG 748 Theories for Practice and Research: Individual, Family, and Community (3)

Theory development and analysis techniques provide the framework for the study of concepts and theories from nursing and related disciplines. These concepts and theories are used to guide therapeutic nursing interventions and research for individual, family, and community client systems. Systems theory and theories related to cultural environments are analyzed to assess and intervene for complex systems.

NRSG 755 Professionalism in Advanced Nursing Practice (3)

An analysis of economic, political, legal, ethical, professional, societal and cultural issues is conducted within the context of advanced nursing practice.  Application of concepts essential to understanding, influencing and leading change in health care delivery specific to advanced nursing practice is emphasized.  PREREQUISITE: Consent of instructor.

NRSG 826 Global Perspectives and Diversity in Health Care (2)

Cultural receptivity is integrated into the collaboration, development, and implementation of health programs at the local, national, and international level. Frameworks that emphasize the meanings of health and health care; international concepts of primary, secondary, and tertiary health care; disease prevention and management; and related ethical, economic, and social justice concerns are introduced. Students partner with a community of interest to understand their health and illness beliefs, identify barriers to health care access, integrate the historical, social, political and economic forces that impact health care. Together they plan and implement appropriate strategies to influence positive community outcomes.

NRSG 883 Complexity Science Approaches to Improve Organizational Effectiveness (3)

The course introduces complexity science principles with the aim of improving the quality and effectiveness of healthcare organizations. Traditional approaches to quality improvement will be contrasted with tools and metrics that can be applied in complex organizations. Principles that relate to embeddedness, diversity, distributed control, co-existence of order and disorder, nonlinearity, inability to predict, emergence, and functioning at the edge of chaos will be introduced. This course may be taken in lieu of NRSG 882, Quality Management; however, both courses cannot count towards your program of study.

NRSG 891 / HP&M 854 Human Resources and Workforce Development (3)

The focus of this the focus of this course is to understand the leadership functions of human resource management in organizations to create a competitive edge through employee empowerment. Core human resource concepts are introduced and applied to optimize human capital within a variety of healthcare settings, including compensation and benefits, employee recognition, and employee/labor relations. National, regional and local strategies and workforce trends are discussed related to best practices for the selection, retention, and management as a healthcare employer of choice. Course is cross listed with HP&M 854.

- Health Policy and Management Discipline - 

These courses, along with the Health Informatics and Leadership core courses, will prepare the student for a career in information systems management and leadership. These positions are found in hospitals, health care systems, clinics, physician group practices, long-term care organizations, governmental entities, insurance and managed care firms, health care information systems companies, consulting firms, etc.

HP&M 810 The Healthcare System (3)

The structure and function of the components of the U.S. healthcare system are introduced in the context of the history, values and social forces that influenced its development and evolution. Students gain exposure to the concepts and vocabulary associated with aspects of the system, including delivery (providers, institutions, services), resources (finance, payment, insurance), population and public health, and outcomes (cost, access, quality). Healthcare outcomes from consumer, clinical and societal perspectives are explored.

HP&M 822: Health Care Economics (3)

This course introduces the core concepts from economics to healthcare with a focus on helping health care managers use economic tools in making sound decisions. The demand for health care products, the structure of insurance, and the supply of health care products are examined. Students will apply a variety of economic analyses to health policy and health system issues.

HP&M 825 Financial Concepts in Healthcare Management (3)

Financial accountability is a critical responsibility of health services administrators. This course presents basic concepts and techniques for effective decision-making and stewardship, including financial statement analysis; strategic financial planning; capital formation; responsibility and cost accounting; operational, capital and cash budgeting; capital project analysis; and working capital management.

HP&M 850/NRSG882 Introduction to Operations (3)

Examines performance of health care organizations, sources of variation, methods of measurement, and strategies for improving performance. Considers several approaches to performance improvement and examines tools widely used in operations management. Incorporates lecture, discussion, and fieldwork. This class is limited to HP&M students and MSHI students who are in the HP&M track.  PREREQUISITE(S): None

HP&M 846 Managing Information Systems and Technology (3)

The course covers fundamental concepts of management information systems; current and developing health and business information systems of interest to managers in health services organizations; healthcare information system architecture; security and privacy issues; uses of healthcare information for clinical and strategic analysis and decision support; techniques required to develop and evaluate a technological request for proposal; and thoughts on the future of healthcare information systems including bio-informatics, community health systems and web-based access to health information. The course will also cover current information and issues regarding the latest technology applications.

HP&M 854 / NRSG 891: Human Resources and Workforce Development (3)

The focus of this course is to understand the leadership functions of human resource management in organizations to create a competitive edge through employee empowerment.  Core human resource concepts are introduced and applied to optimize human capital within a variety of healthcare settings, including compensation and benefits, employee recognition, and employee/labor relations.  National, regional and local strategies and workforce trends are discussed related to best practices for the selection, retention, and management as a healthcare employer of choice..

- Public Health Discipline - 

The discipline specific courses in Public Health deal with concepts related to epidemiology, management of public health data, health communications, and the application of these methods to reduce health disparities.  Additional electives within this discipline are available with the approval of the faculty advisor.  Students in this discipline will also have the opportunity to work in local health departments and organizations and be involved in public health projects using health informatics. 

PRVM 800 Principles of Epidemiology (3)

Basic concepts of epidemiology and methods for identification of factors influencing health and disease in human populations. Considerations are centered on physical, biological, psychosocial and cultural factors in relation to infectious and non-infectious disease; interactions between agent, host and environmental factors as determinants of health and disease; application of the epidemiologic approach to health services; retrospective and prospective analysis of morbidity and mortality data. Instruction is by lectures, laboratory exercises, and seminars.

PRVM 809 Introduction to Public Health (3)

An introduction to contemporary public health principles and practice addressing the history, philosophy and scope of public health practice with emphasis on current organization and administration of programs, recent developments and trends, public health law and regulations and the interface of public and other health related systems.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC. 

PRVM 815 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)

This course emphasizes the underlying concepts of the epidemiologic approach as it relates to infectious diseases.  Students will be introduced to principles and methods of disease surveillance and outbreak investigations using case studies.  Essential concepts relating to vaccine efficacy and effectiveness in preventing infectious diseases, barriers to achieving adequate vaccine coverage, and how ongoing vaccine controversies relate to the scientific lieterature base will be covered.  The evolving public health concerns of bioterrorism and antibiotic resistance will also be addressed.  Characteristics of the agent, host, and environment that influence disease transmission will be examined in the context of control strategy identification.  Instruction is primarily by online learning tools, with limited short lectures. Prerequisite: PRVM 800 Principles of Epidemiology.

PRVM 875 Management of Public Health Data (3)

Basic data and computing knowledge and skills to persons working in public health and clinical research fields. Data set building and maintenance, data analysis, descriptive epidemiology. Statistics limited. SAS, Epi-Info, SPSS, Kansas Integrated Public Health System (KIPHS), EXCEL and ACCESS. 

PRVM 877 Health Communications (3)

This course is focused on community health education and promotion, expecially designing and evaluating health communication programs for populations with shared risks, exposures or behaviors.  Ways in which the general public receives and assigns meaning to health messages will be reviewed.  The strengths and weaknesses of specific health communication initiatives will be analyzed in terms of theoretical constructs, costs and outcomes.  Students apply public health principles by designing a substantive health communcation piece or educational material.  Prerequisite: PRVM 800: Principles of Epidemiology and PRVM 818: Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health.  Permission of instructor may be granted in lieu of these prerequisites. LEC.
Last modified: Jun 08, 2015
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