Skip to main content

Regional Lab Showcase

Regional Lab Showcases

WHAT IS IT?
New in 2020, the Regional Lab Showcase Video idea was suggested by members of our Regional Trainee Sub-Committee as a way to learn more about the reproductive and perinatal research labs in the Midwest region who participate in the Greenwald Symposium. Labs were encouraged to submit a single video and submit the Regional Lab Showcase Data. Additional videos will only be available to those who register for our Greenwald Symposium.


Regional Lab Showcases

PI: Sathish Kumar Natarajan

Institution: University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Lab Personnel

  • Philma Glora Muthuraj, Graduate Student
  • Prakash Kumar Sahoo, Graduate Student
  • Ellie Rautio, Graduate Student
  • Jillian Power, Undergraduate Student
  • Jenna Whitemore, Undergraduate Student

Current Research Projects

  • Develop a nutraceutical approach to mitigate liver and placental lipotoxicity during acute fatty liver of pregnancy and maternal obesity, respectively.
  • We are also interested in elucidating the protective role of dietary palmitoleate supplementation in preventing against Zika virus-induced placental trophoblast apoptosis.

PI: John S. Davis, PhD

Institution: University of Nebraska Medical Center

Lab Personnel

  • Michele R. Plewes, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Emilia Przygrodzka, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Kendra Clark, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Jitu George, Instructor
  • Corrine Monaco, Graduate Student
  • Guojuan Li, Technician

Current Research Projects

  • Determine the role of Hippo Signaling in follicle assembly, development, and differentiation.
  • Investigate how hormones regulate cellular metabolism and intra-organelle communication to promote luteal function.

PI: Warren Nothnick, PhD

Institution: University of Kansas Medical Center

Lab Personnel

  • Amanda Graham, Research Associate
  • Fatimah Aljubran, Graduate Student
  • Chidinma Iweha, Medical Student

Current Research Projects

  • The role of REST in uterine disease. This project utilizes REST deficient mouse models coupled with human tissues and cells to dissec the role of REST in endometriosis, adenomyosis and endometrial cancer.
  • The role of cyclin A2 in uterine physiology and pathophysiology. In this project we are examing the role of cyclin A2 within the uterus using human tissues, endometrial cells and a novel cyclin A2 deficient mouse model.
  • The role of granulysin in abnormal uterine bleeding. Human tissues and cells are used to understand the role of granulysin in the pathophysiology of abnormal uterine bleeding
  • The role of RPLP1 in adenomyosis, endometriosis and endometrial cancer. This project utilizes human tissues and cells integrated with a novel mouse model which over-expresses RPLP1 in endometrial epithelium.

PI: Michael Soares, PhD

Institution: University of Kansas Medical Center

Website

Lab Personnel

  • Khursheed Iqbal, Research Assistant Professor
  • Keisuke Kozai, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Regan Scott, Graduate Student
  • Kaela Varberg, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Marija Kuna, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Mae Winchester, Maternal Fetal Medicine Fellow
  • Vinay Shukla, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Kacey Grooms, Research Assistant
  • Ross McNally, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Mikaela Simon, Research Assistant
  • Ayelen Moreno, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Esteban Dominguez, Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Brynne Musser, Senior Research Associate
  • Kelly Gorman, Maternal Fetal Medicine Fellow
  • Anna Galligos, Undergraduate Research Technician

Current Research Projects

  • Trophoblast Lineage Development
    • Dynamic Regulation of the Chromatin Landscape during Human Invasive Trophoblast Lineage Development
    • HIF2a Regulates Extravillous Trophoblast Lineage Development Independent of Hypoxia
    • NOTUM-dependent Modulation of WNT Signaling in Extravillous Trophoblast Cell Lineage Development
  • Immune Cell Regulatory Events at the Maternal/Fetal Interface
    • CD47 Expression by Invasive Trophoblast: A Mechanism for Immune Cell Evasion at the Maternal/Fetal Interface?
  • Environmental Exposures and Placental Development

Training and Employment Opportunities: Postdoctoral Fellow

PI: Vargheese Chennathukuzhi, PhD

Institution: University of Kansas Medical Center

Lab Personnel

  • Ashley Cloud, Graduate Student
  • Emily Roberts, Graduate Student
  • Sornakala Ganeshkumar, Lab Manager/Tech

Current Research Projects

  • One of our research interests is to understand the biology of an aberrantly expressed G protein-coupled receptor that contributes to the growth of uterine fibroids. Our goal is to develop small molecule and peptidomimetic drugs for the treatment of uterine fibroids.
  • A second project looks at the role of REST protein in the pathogenesis of hormone responsive diseases like uterine leiomyomas and breast cancer. We utilize genetically modified animal models, primary human fibroid cells, and cell lines to study the effect loss of REST has on hormone signaling pathways.
  • Another research interest includes looking upstream of REST to determine why it is missing in uterine fibroids. We use genetically modified mouse models to determine how PRICKLE1 may be responsible for REST protein degradation.

PI: Michele Pritchard, PhD

Institution: University of Kansas Medical Center

Lab Personnel

  • Wendena Parkes, Graduate Student

Current Research Projects

  • Project 1: Impact of hyaluronan fragmentation in reproductive aging
    The female reproductive system is the first organ system to age and while most reproductive aging research has focused on the oocyte, our lab was the first to demonstrate that the ovarian stroma changes with advanced reproductive age - it becomes fibrotic and inflamed. We have also observed a striking loss of ovarian hyaluronan with age leading us to hypothesize that hyaluronan is involved in age-associated ovarian stromal changes.
  • Project 2: Hyaluronan-mediated acceleration of alcohol-induced liver injury
    Alcohol-associated liver disease (ALD) is an incurable disease, and our lab recently discovered a unique accumulation of hyaluronan in livers from donors who consumed alcohol compared to livers from donors who did not consume alcohol. In both cases, the donor livers were steatotic - an early form of liver disease characterized by fat accumulation in hepatocytes. Moreover, the livers with more hyaluronan also exhibited more collagen accumulation suggesting a pathogenic tie between alcohol, hyaluronan, and early fibrogenic chances.
  • Project 3: Role for the hyaluronan in liver regeneration
    Our lab has shown that liver regeneration is associated with a robust hyaluronan accumulation. If we inhibit hyaluronan synthesis, liver regeneration is delayed. Moreover, if we look for hepatic hyaluronan in an animal model where liver injury is so severe that livers cannot regenerate, hyaluronan is not produced. Collectively, these data suggest a critical role for hyaluronan in liver regeneration and further suggest that hyaluronan could be used to improve liver regeneration.

Last modified: Oct 05, 2020
ID=x35815