Note: References to Major, followed by page numbers, pertain to the following book unless otherwise noted: Major, Ralph H., A History of Medicine. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas, 1954.

19th Century

Box No.

Image

No.

Description

Photo

Neg.

Slide

S-3

19-1

Ludwig’s kymograph, 1847. Carl Ludwig (1816-95) invented the kymograph, used to study circulation, in 1847. Major, 791

   

2

P-4

S-3

19-2

Vierordt, Karl von (1881-1884), 1855. Von Vierordt established the modern method of estimating blood pressure in 1853. Major, 801-02

2

 

2

P-4

S-3

19-3

Vierordt, Karl von, blood pressure apparatus. Von Vierordt established the modern method of estimating blood pressure by adding weights to a sphygmograph (an instrument which made a tracing of the human pulse) in 1853. Major, 801-02. [Filed under 15-3-N-2--shared negative.]

2

1

1

S-3

19-4

Potain, Pierre, sphygmomanometer, application of. The sphygmomanometer was the first accurate and practical instrument for estimating blood pressure. In the version invented by Pierre Potain (1825-1901), a rubber tube with an aneroid manometer was attached to a compressible bulb filled with air. Major, 890, 975

   

2

S-3

19-5

Basch, Samuel von, sphygmomanometer, 1880. Von Basch (1837-1905) invented the sphygmanometer, the first accurate and practical instrument for estimating blood pressure, in 1880. A rubber ball filled with water, with a mercury manometer attached above it, was pressed upon the pulse until the beat was obliterated. The point of disappearance registered by the manometer was considered the systolic pressure. Major, 900

   

1

S-3

19-6

Waller, Augustus D. By connecting electrodes placed on the surface of the body to a capillary electrometer, Waller showed in 1887 that an electric current could be detected during contractions of the human heart. Major, 946

   

2

S-3

19-7

EKG tracing, Augustus Waller. First electrocardiographic tracing, obtained by Augustus Waller in 1887. Major, 946

   

1

S-3

19-8

Hammer, Adam, portrait

   

1

S-3

19-9

Hammer, Adam, from photograph of a painting

   

1

S-3

19-10

Humboldt-Institut, seal, 1859

   

1

S-3

19-11

Humboldt-Institut, first faculty, 1860-61. Hammer, second from right

   

1

S-3

19-12

Humboldt Medical College, "Prospectus of the Course of Instruction in the Humboldt Medical College," 1866. Front page of catalog for Winter session beginning September 17, 1866.

   

2

S-3

19-13

Humboldt Medical College, list of faculty, 1859-60. Catalog page. Lists Adam Hammer as dean, Professor der Anatomie, Chirurgie und Augenheilkund und der Chirurgisch-opthalmalogischen Klinic.

   

1

S-3

19-14

Humboldt Medical College, diploma, MDCCCLXVIII (1868)

   

1

S-3

19-15

Hammer, Adam, newspaper article about Hammer in Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift, February 2, 1878: "Ein Fall von thrombotischem Verschlusse einer der Kranz-arterien des Herzens. Am Krankenbette konstatirt, und mitgetheilt vond Dr. A Hammer, Professor der Chirurgie aus St. Louis, derzeit in Wein.

   

1

S-3

19-16

Humboldt-Institut, "Program der Deutschen Naturwisshenschaftlich-Medicinischen Schule," 1899-90. Catalog for Humboldt-Institut, St. Louis, MO, 1899-90 semester

   

1

S-3

19-17

Liebig, Justus von (1803-73), portrait. Liebig introduced the concept of metabolism in Organic Chemistry in its Application to Physiology and Pathology, 1842. Major, 791-92

   

2

S-3

19-18

Pettenkofer, Max von (1818-1901), portrait. Pettenkofer founded the modern study of metabolism and made the first accurate studies of the caloric values of many foods. Major, 884

   

1

S-3

19-19

Pettenkofer, Max von, "Respiration Chamber." In this chamber Max von Pettenkofer (1818-1901) conducted 20 years of groundbreaking studies on respiration, metabolism, nutrition, and food values. Major, 884

   

1

S-3

19-20

Direct basal metabolism, measuring. Ca.1900 photo of doctors measuring basal metabolism.

   

1

S-3

19-21

Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, 1910, view from SW. Johns Hopkins University opened in 1876, the Hospital in 1889 and the School of Medicine in 1893. The School of Medicine elevated the standards of medical education and the hospital introduced a new era in American professional training. Major, 852-53

   

1

P-4

S-3

19-22

Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, "The Four Doctors," John Singer Sargent portrait of William H. Welch, William Halsted (standing), William Osler, and Howard Kelly, all of whom played important roles in the early days of Johns Hopkins Hospital and Medical College. Major, 852-53

2

3

1

S-3

19-23

Barker, Lewellys F. (1867-1943). Barker was chair of medicine at Johns Hopkins from 1905 until 1921, when he became professor emeritus. His 1899 work Nervous System and Its Constituent Neurones remains a standard treatise. Major, 860, 955, 1028

   

1

P-4

S-3

19-24

Billings, John Shaw (1838-1913). Billings planned and organized Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was an authority on military medicine and wrote was has been called the best English-language history of surgery. Major, 900

 

1

1

S-3

19-25

Cushing, Harvey (1869-1939), as a young man. Cushing was a graduate of and associate professor at Johns Hopkins University, and the outstanding neurological surgeon of the 20th century. His 1912 work The Pituitary Body and its Disorders was a surgical and physiological classic. Major, 231

   

1

P-4

19-26-A

Kelly, Howard (1858-1943). Enlarged portrait of Kelly only from "The Four Doctors" by Sargent. Major, 918.

 

1

 

P-4

19-26-B

Kelly, Howard (1858-1943). Head shot of Kelly only from "The Four Doctors" by Sargent, but depicted with wings, hovering above Johns Hopkins Medical Center. Major, 918.

2

1

 

P-4

S-3

19-27

Gross, Samuel D. (1805-84), one of the greatest American surgeons of his time. His 1839 work Elements of Pathology and Anatomy was the first comprehensive treatise on pathologic anatomy in the English language. Major, 762

 

1

1

S-3

19-28

Howell, William H. (1860-1945). Professor of physiology at Johns Hopkins who conducted important investigations on the circulation and coagulation of the blood and discovered and isolated heparin. His 1906 Text-book of Physiology went through 14 editions during his lifetime. Major, 919

   

1

S-3

19-29

Mall, Franklin P. (1862-1917). Mall in 1893 became the first professor of anatomy in the new Johns Hopkins University medical school. His investigations in embryology were among the most significant of the time. Major, 855, 919

   

1

S-3

19-30

Thayer, William S. (1864-1932). Thayer served as a professor at Johns Hopkins Hospital until 1921. He did excellent research on malaria fever and on endocarditis and was one of the first to point out the occurrence of eosinophilia in trichinosis. Major, 1050

   

1

P-4

S-3

19-31

Welch, William H. (1850-1934), Welch helped establish the Johns Hopkins medical school and served as its first dean. He held the chair of pathology until 1916, when he became director of the newly founded School of Hygiene and Public Health. Major, 911, 990

 

1

1

S-3

19-32

Williams, John W. (1866-1931). Williams served as dean of the John Hopkins School of Medicine from 1911-23. His 1903 work Obstetrics was for a time the most popular text in its field. Major, 860, 1052

   

1

P-4

S-3

19-33

Herrick, James. Herrick described the first case of sickle-cell anemia in 1910. He gave the first complete clinical description of sudden coronary occlusion in 1912, and his work on coronary disease remains one of the great contributions to cardiology. Major, 949-50

 

1

2

S-3

19-34

Obstetrics: midwife, Turkey 19th century

   

1

P-4

S-3

19-35

Birthing chair, Stein, 1800. Georg Wilhelm Stein was one of several well-known German obstetricians who made improvements to the obstetrical chair. (Filed under 16-14-N—shared negative)

 

1

1

S-3

19-36

Birthing chair, Siebold, 1804, upright position. Elias von Siebold was one of several well-known German obstetricians who made improvements to the obstetrical chair.

   

1

S-3

19-37

Birthing chair, Siebold, 1804, reclining position. Elias von Siebold was one of several well-known German obstetricians who made improvements to the obstetrical chair.

   

1

S-3

19-38

Birthing chair, Siebold, 1804, disassembled. Elias von Siebold was one of several well-known German obstetricians who made improvements to the obstetrical chair.

   

1

P-4

S-3

19-39

Bassi, Agostino (1771-1856). Bassi is considered by some to be the founder of the parasitic theory of infection. Major, 798, 827-28

4

1

1

S-3

19-40

Temperature curve, first published, Traube, 1852. Ludwig Traube (1818-76) was one of the founders of experimental pathology. Major, 848

   

1

S-3

19-41

Déjérine, Jules (1849-1917). Déjérine was one of the leading French neurologists of his period and made many contributions to the pathology of aphasia, encephalitis, poliomyelitis, syringomeyelia, and neuritis. Major, 1032

   

1

S-3

19-42

Billroth, Christian Albert Theodor (1829-1894), statue, 1961. Billroth was one of the greatest surgeons of his time and known particularly as a pioneer of surgery on the gastro-intestinal tract. He also performed the first excision of the larynx. Major, 895

   

1

S-3

19-43

Broadbent, William (1835-1907). Sir Broadbent wrote The Pulse (1897) and Heart Disease (1897) and is remembered for his description of "Broadbent’s sign" in adhesive pericarditis. Major, 898

   

1

S-3

19-44

St. Martin, Alexis, medical history. St. Martin was the subject of studies by Dr. William Beaumont because of a gastric fistula caused by a gunshot wound. Beaumont’s studies of gastric digestion resulted in the classic 1833 work Experiments and Observations on the Gastric Juice. Major, 749

   

1

P-4

S-3

19-45

St. Martin, Alexis, portrait at age 81. St. Martin was the subject of studies by Dr. William Beaumont because of a gastric fistula caused by a gunshot wound. Beaumont’s studies of gastric digestion resulted in the classic 1833 work Experiments and Observations on the Gastric Juice. Major, 749

 

1

1

P-4

S-3

19-46

St. Martin, Alexis, illustration of fistula of, from William Beaumont’s classic in physiology Experiments and Observations on the Gastric Juice, 1833. Beaumont, a surgeon, studied gastric digestion firsthand by observing this fistula caused by a gunshot wound. Major, 749

1

 

1

S-3

19-47

Gastric fistula, Alexis St. Martin, detail. Illustration of St. Martin’s fistula from William Beaumont’s classic in physiology Experiments and Observations on the Gastric Juice, 1833. Beaumont, a surgeon, studied gastric digestion firsthand by observing this fistula caused by a gunshot wound. Major, 749

   

1

S-3

19-48

Beaumont, William. Beaumont studied gastric digestion firsthand by observing a fistula caused by a gunshot wound in patient Alexis St. Martin. Based on his observations, the surgeon wrote Experiments and Observations on the Gastric Juice, a classic in physiology, in 1833. Major, 749

   

1

P-4

S-3

19-49

Beaumont, William. Beaumont studied gastric digestion firsthand by observing a fistula caused by a gunshot wound in patient Alexis St. Martin. Based on his observations, the surgeon wrote Experiments and Observations on the Gastric Juice, a classic in physiology, in 1833. Major, 749

 

1

1

S-4

19-50

Transylvania University. Second medical building of the Medical School of Transylvania University, founded 1820 in Lexington, KY. The school’s demise was due in part to the opening of the Medical College in Louisville in 1837. Major, 743

   

1

P-4

S-4

19-51

Massachusetts General Hospital, which opened in 1821. (Note: the photo and negative are identical, and are labeled 1821; the slide is a slightly different view.) Major, 737

1

1

1

P-4

S-4

19-52

Rush Medical College. Chartered in 1837, the college first offered courses of instruction in 1843. It was a notable institution for more than 50 years and boasted many distinguished physicians on its staff and among its alumni. In 1898 the college became the medical department of the University of Chicago. Major, 723

1

2

1

P-4

S-4

19-53

McDowell, Ephraim (1771-1830), 1829. McDowell the "Father of Ovariotomy," performed the first such surgery in 1809 by removing a 22-pound ovarian tumor from a supposedly pregnant patient. His 1817 published account of the operation created a sensation. He performed eight more ovariotomies, the last in 1826. Major, 738-41.

9

2

2

P-4

19-53-A

McDowell, Ephraim (1771-1830), 1829 etching based on portrait in 195-53. Major, 738-41

1

   

P-4

S-4

19-54

Mott, Valentine (1785-1865). Mott was the leader of American surgery for nearly 50 years and reputedly performed more "great operations" than any surgeon of his time. His first famous surgery was the first-ever ligation of the innominate artery, performed in 1818. Major, 734-35

 

1

1

P-4

S-4

19-55

Flint, Austin (1812-86). Flint, a professor of medicine, was a prolific writer who had a great influence on medicine in his day. His best-known works include A Manual of Percussion and Auscultation (1876) and the classic A Treatise on the Principles and Practice of Medicine (1866). Major, 769-60, 770

1

1

1

P-4

S-4

19-57

Loeffler, Friedrich. In 1898 Loffler discovered that ultramicroscopic viruses could cause disease. Major, 842, 936

 

1

1

S-4

19-58

Marey’s pulsograph (slide says sphygmograph). Étienne-Jules Marey (1830-1904) developed a safer method of measuring blood pressure through a wrist sphygmograph, 1857. A more sophisticated than Hale’s blood pressure measurement of a horse, Marey’s method constituted a giant step forward.

   

1

S-4

19-59

Marey’s pulsograph, attached to wrist

   

1

S-4

19-60-A

Diagnostic doll, China, front view. Chinese women used the dolls to point to the ailing parts of their anatomy during doctors’ visits; it was considered indecent for the doctors to examine female patients. K.U. Medical Center History of Medicine

   

4

P-4

19-60-B

Diagnostic doll, China, b & w, view is more from above. Chinese women used the dolls to point to the ailing parts of their anatomy during doctors’ visits; it was considered indecent for the doctors to examine female patients. K.U. Medical Center History of Medicine

4

3

 

P-4

19-60-C

Diagnostic doll, China, b & w, front view, close-up. Chinese women used the dolls to point to the ailing parts of their anatomy during doctors’ visits; it was considered indecent for the doctors to examine female patients. Chinese women used the dolls to point to the ailing parts of their anatomy during doctors’ visits; it was considered indecent for the doctors to examine female patients. K.U. Medical Center History of Medicine

6

   

S-4

19-60-D

Diagnostic doll, China, b & w, view from above. Chinese women used the dolls to point to the ailing parts of their anatomy during doctors’ visits; it was considered indecent for the doctors to examine female patients. K.U. Medical Center History of Medicine

   

3

S-4

19-60-E

Diagnostic doll, China, b & w, view from above, distant. Chinese women used the dolls to point to the ailing parts of their anatomy during doctors’ visits; it was considered indecent for the doctors to examine female patients. K.U. Medical Center History of Medicine

   

2

P-4

S-4

19-61

Stethoscopes, early

   

1

P-4

19-62

Koch, Robert (1843-1910). Koch discovered the process of developing the anthrax bacillus (1876), invented a new method of photographing bacteria on slides, created a new method of obtaining pure cultures of bacteria, and discovered the tubercle bacillus (1882). Major, 838-40

1

1

 

P-4

19-63

Koch, Robert (1843-1910). Koch discovered the process of developing the anthrax bacillus (1876), invented a new method of photographing bacteria on slides, created a new method of obtaining pure cultures of bacteria, and discovered the tubercle bacillus (1882). Major, 838-40

1

1

 

P-4

19-64

Billroth, Christian Albert Theodor (1829-1894). "Billroth im Horsaal," painting of Billroth in operating room. Billroth was one of the greatest surgeons of his time and known particularly as a pioneer of surgery on the gastro-intestinal tract. He also performed the first excision of the larynx. Major, 895 (19-76-N filed under 18-78-N—shared negative.)

1

   

P-4

19-65

Virchow Krankenhaus (Hospital). Founded by Rudolf Virchow (1821-1902), outstanding physician of his generation. Major, 822

2

   

P-4

19-66

Virchow Krankenhaus (Hospital), aerial view. Founded by Rudolf Virchow (1821-1902), outstanding physician of his generation. Major, 822

 

1

 

P-4

19-67

Koch, Robert (1843-1910), in lab. Koch discovered the process of developing the anthrax bacillus (1876), invented a new method of photographing bacteria on slides, created a new method of obtaining pure cultures of bacteria, and discovered the tubercle bacillus (1882). Major, 837

 

2

 

P-4

19-68

Helmholtz, Hermann von (1821-94), shown at age 27, one year after his memoir on the conservation of energy was published. Photo from Koenigsberger, Hermann von Helmholtz, Oxford, 1906. Major, 803

 

1

 

P-4

19-69

Virchow, Rudolf (1821-1902), outstanding physician of his generation. University of KS Collection. Major, 806

 

1

 

P-4

19-70

Schelling, Friedrich von (1775-1854). Major, 698

 

1

 

P-4

19-71

Röntgen, W. C. (1845-1923) German physicist awarded the Nobel prize in physics in 1901 for the discovery of X-rays in 1895. Major, 865

 

1

 

P-4

19-72

Röntgen, W. C. (1845-1923) German physicist awarded the Nobel prize in physics in 1901 for the discovery of X-rays in 1895. Major, 865

 

1

 

P-4

19-73-A

Gall, Franz Joseph. "A Lecture by Dr. Gall." Caricature by J. Rowlandson, p. 678 in Major. 1758-1828. Major, 677-81

 

2

 

P-4

19-73-B

Gall, Franz Joseph. "Calves’ Heads and Brains or a Phrenological Lecture," 1826. Major, 677-81 [19-73-B-2 filed under 19-73-A-N-2—shared negative)

1

2

 

P-4

19-74

Soemmering, Samuel Thomas von (1755-1830). Major, 701

 

1

 

P-4

19-75

Cohn, Ferdinand Julius (1828-1898). Major, 892

 

1

 

P-4

19-76

Hahneman, Samuel (1755-1843). University of KS Collection. Major, 694-98

 

1

 

P-4

19-77

Klebs, Edwin (1843-1913). Portrait by H. Treunfels, 1879, as printed in the New England Journal of Medicine, 1935. Major, 842-44

 

1

 

P-4

19-78

Klebs, Edwin (1843-1913). Major, 842-44

 

1

 

P-4

19-79

Theirsch, Karl (1822-95). Major, 888 (Negative filed under 19-78—shared negative.)

 

1

 

P-4

19-80

Weigert, Carl (1845-1904). Major, 906

 

1

 

P-4

19-81

Hoppe-Seyler, Ernest Felix (1825-95). Major, 891 [Negative filed under 19-80-N—shared negative.]

 

1

 

P-4

19-82

Kölliker, Rudolf Albert (1817-1905). Major, 883-84

 

1

 

P-4

19-83

Naunyn, Bernard (1839-1925). Major, 902 [Negative filed under 19-82-N—shared negative.]

 

1

 

P-4

19-84

Virchow, Rudolf (1821-1902), outstanding physician of his generation.

 

1

 

P-4

19-85

Nothnagel, Hermann (1841-1905). Major, 904 [left on negative]

 

1

 

P-4

19-86

Kussmaul, Adolf, (1822-1902), bust. Major, 887 [right on negative]

 

1

 

P-4

19-87

Semmelweis, Ignaz Philipp (1818-65). Major, 784, 884

 

2

 

P-4

19-88

Virchow, Rudolf (1821-1902), outstanding physician of his generation. University of KS Collection. Major, 806

1

   

P-4

19-89

Virchow, Rudolf (1821-1902) outstanding physician of his generation. Major, 806

 

1

 

P-4

19-90

Johns Hopkins Medical Center, aerial view. Major, 853.

1

1

 

P-4

19-91

Hall, Sarah, M.D.

1

   

P-4

19-92

Thumb, Tom

3

   

P-4

19-93

Anesthesia, page from Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, 1846 (Negative filed under 19-90-N—shared negative.)

3

1

 

P-4

19-94

North, Elisha. Major, 767.

2

   

P-4

19-95

McDowell, Ephraim (1771-1830). Major, 741

1

   

P-4

19-96

Zion Tabernacle, International Diving Healing Association, 1893, building exterior (see also 19-120 through 19-123)

3

   

P-4

19-97

McDowell, Ephraim (1771-1830), shown performing surgery in "The First Ovariotomy," painting by Prof. George Kasson Knapp. Major, 741

1

1

 

P-4

19-98

Welch, William, "Some Welch Rabbits."; Major, 911, 990

1

1

 

P-4

19-99

Gilman, Daniel Colt (1846-?). First president of Johns Hopkins. Major, 852. (19-99-N filed under 19-98--shared negative.)

 

1

 

P-4

19-100

Drake, Daniel (1785-1852). Major, 708, 743-44, 769

1

1

 

P-4

19-101

Osler, William (1849-1920), in Nascitur Library, writing textbook. Major, 909

 

2

 

P-4

19-102

Knight, Jonathan. Professor of surgery in Yale College -- and AMA president?

1

   

P-4

19-103

Warner, John C. Professor of anatomy and surgery, University of Cambridge

1

   

P-4

19-104-A

Morton, William (1819-68). Major, 753

1

2

 

P-4

19-104-B

Morton, William (1819-68). Major, 753

 

1

 

P-4

19-105

Ether, monument to, Boston

 

1

 

P-4

19-106

Ether dome, inscription on wall, Massachusetts General Hospital

 

1

 

P-4

19-107

Ether, William Morton administering, Oct. 16, 1846. Morton: Major, 753

 

1

 

P-4

19-108

Massachusetts General Hospital, front view. Major, 737

 

1

 

P-4

19-109

Flint, Austin (1812-1886), certificate of private instruction signed by. Flint, professor of medicine, was a prolific writer who had a great influence on medicine in his day. His best-known works include A Manual of Percussion and Auscultation (1876) and the classic A Treatise on the Principles and Practice of Medicine (1866). Major, 769-60, 770

 

1

 

P-4

19-110

Phrenology, from Johann Spurzheim’s Outlines of Phrenology, 1827. Major, 1077

1

   

P-4

19-111

Mott, Valentine (1785-1865). Portrait, standing. Mott was the leader of American surgery for nearly 50 years. His first famous surgery was the first-ever ligation of the innominate artery, performed in 1818. He reputedly performed more "great operations" than any surgeon of his time. Major, 734-35

1

1

 

P-4

19-112-A

Mott, Valentine (1785-1865), medical office from 1861-65. Mott was the leader of American surgery for nearly 50 years. His first famous surgery was the first-ever ligation of the innominate artery, performed in 1818. He reputedly performed more "great operations" than any surgeon of his time. Major, 734-35

 

1

 

P-4

19-112-B

Mott, Valentine (1785-1865), medical office from 1861-65. Close-up of plaque on building. Mott was the leader of American surgery for nearly 50 years. His first famous surgery was the first-ever ligation of the innominate artery, performed in 1818. He reputedly performed more "great operations" than any surgeon of his time. Major, 734-35

 

1

 

P-4

19-113

Chapman, N., AMA president and professor of medicine, University of Pennsylvania

1

   

P-4

19-114

Pope, Charles, AMA president and professor in medical dept. of University of St. Louis

1

   

P-4

19-115

Davis, N. S., AMA president and professor at Rush Medical College

1

   

P-4

19-116

Moultice?, James, AMA president and professor at Medical College of South Carolina

1

   

P-4

19-117

Willford?, R., AMA president and professor at Medical College of Virginia

1

   

P-4

19-118

Holmes, Oliver Wendell, portrait, 1850. Major, 756-59 [Filed under 19-27-N—shared negative.]

 

1

 

P-4

19-119

Nott, Josiah (1804-73). Major, 769

1

   

P-4

19-120

Dowie, John Alexander (1848-1907). U.S religious leader, born in Edinburgh, Scotland; self-styled "Elijah the Restorer"; preached "faith healing"; founded Christian Catholic church 1901 in Zion, IL. (Compton’s Encyclopedia)

3

   

P-4

19-121

Dowie, John Alexander (1848-1907). U.S religious leader, born in Edinburgh, Scotland; self-styled "Elijah the Restorer"; preached "faith healing"; founded Christian Catholic church 1901 in Zion, IL. (Compton’s Encyclopedia)

2

   

P-4

19-122

Zion Tabernacle, International Diving Healing Association, 1893, building interior

2

   

P-4

19-123

Zion Tabernacle, International Diving Healing Association, 1893, view of orthopedic devices discarded by patients cured by John Alexander Dowie (1848-1907), U.S religious leader, born in Edinburgh, Scotland; self-styled "Elijah the Restorer"; preached "faith healing"; founded Christian Catholic church 1901 in Zion, IL. (Compton’s Encyclopedia)

2

   

P-4

19-124

Brunton, Thomas. Major, 905

 

1

 

P-4

19-125

Laennec, René (1781-1826). Major, 660-65, 708

 

1

 

P-4

19-126

Murrell, William

 

1

 

P-4

19-127

Pasteur, Louis (1822-95). Major, 829

 

1

 

P-4

19-128

Addison, Thomas (1793-1866). Major, 690

 

1

 

P-4

19-129

Baillie, Matthew (1761-1823). Major, 702

 

1

 

P-4

19-130

Cooper, Astley (1768-1841). Major, 692

 

1

 

P-4

19-131

Curling, Thomas Blizard (1811-88). Major, 882

 

1

 

P-4

19-132

Elliotson, John (1791-1868). Major, 710

2

   

P-4

19-133

Graves, Robert (1797-1853). Major, 682

 

1

 

P-4

19-134

Hutchinson, Jonathan (1828-1913). Major, 893

1

1

 

P-4

19-135

Gull, William (1816-90). Major, 815

 

1

 

P-4

19-136

Ross, Sir Ronald (1857-1932). Major, 862, 916

1

   

P-4

19-137

Nightingale, Florence (1820-1910). Pencil drawing, age 37, by Sir George Scharf in the National Portrait Gallery, 1857. Major, 867-69. (Negative N-2 filed under 19-159-N-2—shared negative.)

 

2

 

P-4

19-138

Nightingale, Florence (1820-1910). From a model of a statue by A. G. Walker. Major, 867-69

 

1

 

P-4

19-139

Nightingale, Florence (1820-1910). Painting: "Mission of Mercy," Nightingale at Scutari. Major, 867-69

 

1

 

P-4

19-140

Paget, James (1814-99). Portrait by George Richmond, 1867. Major, 816-18.

 

1

 

P-4

19-141

Paget, James (1814-99). Major, 816-18.

 

1

 

P-4

19-142

Simpson, William

3

2

 

P-4

19-142-A

Simpson, William

 

1

 

P-4

19-143

Syme, James (1799-1870). Major, 822, 879

 

1

 

P-4

19-144

St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, 1844. Major, 453

1

   

P-4

19-145

Guy’s Hospital, from an engraving by John Fowles, 1725. Major, 686

 

2

 

P-4

19-146

Meath Hospital in 1915, the oldest voluntary hospital in continuous existence in Ireland, the oldest university teaching hospital and the most significant institution in Ireland in terms of medical history. Founded in 1753 to care for the sick and poor of the Liberties, the hospital took on the mantle of the County Dublin Infirmary in 1774. The hospital moved to the site pictured here in 1822. (From indigo.ie/~arhc/arhchx.html )

1

1

 

P-4

19-147

Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Major, 819.

 

1

 

P-4

19-148

Paget's disease of the nipple. Major, 818

 

1

 

P-4

19-149

Lister, Joseph (1827-1912), antiseptic spray. Major, 825

1

   

P-4

19-150

Nightingale, Florence (1820-1910), corridor adjoining her quarters in Barrack Hospital, Scutari, 1854. Major 867-69.

 

1

 

P-4

19-151

Steam carbolic spray producer, 1870, invented by Joseph Lister (1827-1912). Major, 825

 

1

 

P-4

19-152

Kidney, in dropsy, from Reports of Medical Cases, Richard Bright, 1827

 

1

 

P-4

19-153

Bernard, Claude (1813-78). Major, 775-78

 

1

 

P-4

19-154

Bretonneau, Pierre (1778-1862). Portrait by Moreu in the Hospice General, Tours. Major, 667-69, 707.

1

   

P-4

19-155

Dunant, Henri, in young manhood. Major, 869-71

1

1

 

P-4

19-156

Dunant, Henri. Major, 869-71

2

1

 

P-4

19-157

Dupuytren, Guillaume (1777-1862), operating on woman with cataracts, in presence of Charles X, Hôtel-Dieu, Paris. Major, 648-49

2

1

 

P-4

19-158

Dupuytren, Guillaume (1777-1862), portrait. Major, 648-49

1

   

P-4

19-159

Laennec, René (1781-1826), sketch. Major, 660-65, 708

 

1

 

P-5

19-160

Laennec, René; (1781-1826), examining a patient at the Necker Hospital, 1816, from painting in the Sorbonne. Major, 660-65, 708

1

1

 

P-5

19-161

Laennec, René (1781-1826), plaque. Major, 660-65, 708

 

2

 

P-5

19-162

Laennec, René; (1781-1826), stethoscope invented by. Major, 661-62

1

1

 

P-5

19-163-A

Laennec, René; (1781-1826), monument to. Major, 660-65, 708

2

   

P-5

19-163-B

Laennec, René (1781-1826), monument to. Major, 660-65, 708

1

   

P-5

19-164

Laennec, René (1781-1826), portrait. Major, 660-65, 708

 

1

 

P-5

19-165

Louis, Pierre Charles Alexandre (1787-1872). Major, 671-73

4

   

P-5

19-166

Pasteur, Louis (1822-95), portrait. Major, 829-36, 877

1

1

 

P-5

19-167

Pasteur, Louis (1822-95), portrait. Major, 829-36, 877

1

   

P-5

19-168

Pasteur, Louis (1822-95), lecturing at International Congress of Medicine. Major, 829-36, 877

2

1

 

P-5

19-169-A

Pasteur, Louis (1822-95), in his laboratory. Major, 829-36, 877

 

2

 

P-5

19-169-B

Pasteur, Louis (1822-95), in his laboratory. Major, 829-36, 877

 

1

 

P-5

19-170

Brown-Sequard, Charles (1817-94). Major, 779-81

1

1

 

P-5

19-171

Laveran, Charles Leon Alphonse (1845-1922). Major, 907-08

 

1

 

P-5

19-172

Nothnagel, Hermann (1841-1905). Major, 904

 

1

 

P-5

19-173

Frank, Johann Peter (1745-1821). Major, 642-44 (Filed under 19-64-N—shared negative.)

 

1

 

P-5

19-174

Larrey, Dominic-Jean (1766-1842), one of the great surgeons of the period. Major, 645-47

 

1

 

P-5

19-175

Potain, Pierre (1825-1901). Major, 890, 975

 

1

 

P-5

19-176

Velpeau, Alfred-Armand-Louis-Marie (1795-1867). Major, 773-74

2

1

 

P-5

19-177

Cammann’s stethoscopes. In 1855, Dr. George Cammann of New York produced the first recognized usable binaural stethoscope while working as a physician at the Northern Dispensary; he did not claim to have the original idea for a binaural stethoscope, only to have perfected it. Cammann never put his name on the piece; the manufacturer of the original, George Tiemann, named it "Cammann’s".

 

1

 

P-5

19-178

Cammann’s stethoscopes. In 1855, Dr. George Cammann of New York produced the first recognized usable binaural stethoscope while working as a physician at the Northern Dispensary; he did not claim to have the original idea for a binaural stethoscope, only to have perfected it. Cammann never put his name on the piece; the manufacturer of the original, George Tiemann, named it "Cammann’s".

 

1

 

P-5

19-179

Cammann’s stethoscopes. In 1855, Dr. George Cammann of New York produced the first recognized usable binaural stethoscope while working as a physician at the Northern Dispensary; he did not claim to have the original idea for a binaural stethoscope, only to have perfected it. Cammann never put his name on the piece; the manufacturer of the original, George Tiemann, named it "Cammann’s."

 

1

 

P-5

19-180

Pattison, Granville Sharp (1791-1851), an anatomist from Glasgow, founded the anatomy departments at Jefferson College (Philadelphia), the University of London, and the Medical University of City of New York (now known as New York University). http://health.upenn.edu/~bioethic/library/papers/baker/Resistance.html

 

1

 

P-5

19-181

Larrey’s (Dominic-Jean) Flying Ambulance. Major, 640, 645-46

8

1

 

P-5

19-182

Larrey, Dominic-Jean (1766-1842), surgical techniques for war wounds. Major, 640, 645-46

 

1

 

P-5

19-183

Pasteur Institute. Major, 833, 835.

 

1

 

P-5

19-184

Pasteur’s tomb in the Pasteur Institute. Major, 833, 835.

 

1

 

P-5

19-185

Larrey and Napoleon. Dominique Larrey (1766-1842) invented surgical techniques for war wounds. Major, 640, 645-46

 

1

 

P-5

19-186-A

Hallucinations, sketch drawn by patient of Dr. Marchand, from Hallucinations of Sight, Chapter 7.

2

   

P-5

19-186-B

Hallucinations, sketch drawn by patient of Dr. Marchand, from Hallucinations of Sight, Chapter 7.

2

   
 

19-187

Surgeons, French and German, at bedside of wounded soldier

1

   
 

19-188

Hospital, French, in country church

1

   
 

19-189

Napoleon at French hospital, 1808

2

1

 

P-5

19-190

Ambulance cart, horse-drawn. French?

 

1

 

P-5

19-191

Pinel, Philippe (1755-1826), striking the shackles from the insane, from a painting by Charles Muller. Major, 651-52, 654, 701

1

2

 

P-5

19-192

Pinel, Philippe (1755-1826), statue in front of the Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris. Major, 651-52, 654, 701

 

1

 

P-5

19-193

Rhinoplasty, Pietro Sabattini, Cenno Storico, 1838

1

   

P-5

19-194

Salpêtrière Hospital for mental and nervous diseases, early 1900s. Major, 658

 

1

 

P-5

19-195

Hôtel-Dieu, Paris. Hospital room, reconstructed. Major, 426, 561, 772, 776. [Negative filed under 17-69-N—shared negative]

1

1

 

P-5

19-196

Hôtel-Dieu, Paris, canals on right bank, etching. Major, 426, 561, 772, 776. [Negative filed under 17-71-N—shared negative]

1

1

 

P-5

19-197

Necker Hospital, Paris. Major, 665

2

   

P-5

19-198

Hôtel-Dieu, Paris. Major, 426, 561, 772, 776.

     

P-5

19-199

Hôtel-Dieu, Paris. Major, 426, 561, 772, 776.

     

P-5

19-200

Bassi, Agostino (1771-1856). Bassi is considered by some to be the founder of the parasitic theory of infection. Postage stamp (same image as 19-39), 1953. Major, 827-29

1

1

 

P-5

19-201

Bassi, Agostino (1771-1856). Bassi is considered by some to be the founder of the parasitic theory of infection. Major, 827-29

2

   

P-5

19-202

Bassi, Agostino (1771-1856). Bassi is considered by some to be the founder of the parasitic theory of infection. Major, 827-29

3

   

P-5

19-203

Bassi, Agostino (1771-1856), microscope. Bassi is considered by some to be the founder of the parasitic theory of infection. Major, 827-29

3

   

P-5

19-204

Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, at beginning of 1900s. It became a hospital for mental and nervous disorders in the 1800s. Major, 656 (Filed under 18-83-N—shared negative.)

 

1

 

P-5

19-205

Broussais, François (1772-1838). Major, 664-67

 

1

 

P-5

19-206

Magendie, François (1783-1855), portrait by Guérin. Major, 675, 676, 708, 775, 880

 

1

 

P-5

19-207

Dupuytren, Guillaume (1777-1862), Hôtel-Dieu, Paris. Major, 648-49

 

1

 

P-5

19-208

Louis, Pierre Charles Alexandre (1787-1872). Portrait, Academy of Medicine, Paris. Major, 671-73

 

1

 

P-5

19-209

Corvisart, Jean Nicolas (1755-1821), engraving by Blot from painting by Gerard. Major, 655, 657, 659

 

1

 

P-5

19-210

Kocher, Theodor (1841-1917), one of Switzerland’s great masters of surgery. Major, 970-71

 

2

 

P-5

19-211

Kocher, Theodor (1841-1917), one of Switzerland’s great masters of surgery. Major, 970-71

 

1

 

P-5

19-212

Kocher, Theodor (1841-1917), one of Switzerland’s great masters of surgery. Nobel Prize plaque. Major, 970-71

 

1

 

P-5

19-213

Kocher, Theodor (1841-1917), one of Switzerland’s great masters of surgery. Portrait of child, either of or by Kocher. Major, 970-71

 

1

 

P-5

19-214

Dudley, Benjamin (1785-1870). Major, 741-43 (19-214-N filed under 18-85-N--shared negative.)

 

1

 

P-5

19-215

McDowell, Ephraim (1771-1830). House where he performed first ovariotomy: exterior. Major, 741.

 

1

 

P-5

19-216

McDowell, Ephraim (1771-1830). House where he performed first ovariotomy: operating room. Major, 741.

 

1

 

P-5

19-217

McDowell, Ephraim (1771-1830). House where he performed first ovariotomy: apothecary shop (at least this appears to be in the house). Major, 741.

 

1

 

P-5

19-218

McDowell, Ephraim (1771-1830). House where he performed first ovariotomy: porch and garden. Major, 741.

 

1

 

P-5

19-219

Brown-Sequard, Charles (1817-94). Major, 779-81

1

   

P-5

19-220

Eddy, Mary Baker. Major, 873

1

1

 

P-5

19-221

Senn, Nicholas (1844-1908). Major, 1048

 

1

 

P-5

S-4

19-222

Nightingale, Florence (1820-1910), photographic portrait, seated. Major, 868-69.

3

 

1

P-5

19-223

Osler, William (1849-1920). Major, 909

 

1

 

P-5

19-224

Massachusetts General Hospital, aerial view, showing ether dome. Major, 737

1

   

P-5

19-225

Cushing, Harvey (1869-1939), photograph by Arnold Klebs, 1929. A graduate of and associate professor at Johns Hopkins University, Cushing was the outstanding neurological surgeon of the 20th century. His 1912 work The Pituitary Body and its Disorders was a surgical and physiological classic. Major, 231

 

1

1

P-5

19-226

Sappington, John. Credited with discovering that quinine cured malaria. Portrait by Caleb Hiller Bingham.

 

1

 

P-5

19-227

Corsets, effect on thoracic outlet and pelvis, as shown on skeleton

1

   

P-5

19-228

Warren, John Collins (1778-1856). Major, 738 (19-228-N filed under 18-53-N—shared negative.)

1

1

 

P-5

19-229

Long, Crawford (1831-93). Major, 752

 

1

 

P-5

19-230

Hopkins, Johns (1795-1873), founder of Johns Hopkins University and Hospital. Major, 852. (19-230-N filed under 19-24-N—shared negative.)

 

1

 

P-5

19-231

Eberth, Carl J., discovered typhoid bacillus in 1880. Major, 842

 

1

 

P-5

19-232

Hering, Ewald (1834-1918). German physiologist who investigated respiration and, with Josef Breuer in 1868, demonstrated the role of the vagus nerve in regulating breathing.

1

   

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© 2000 University of Kansas Medical Center
Comments: clendening@kumc.edu
Revised: July 24, 2000