How Do I Know Whether I Can Participate in a Clinical Trial?

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Each trial has certain criteria

Clinical trials have different eligibility guidelines based on age, gender, type and stage of a disease, previous treatment history, and other medical conditions. Some seek participants with specific illnesses or conditions, and others seek healthy volunteers.

Check the guidelines of the study you are considering, talk with your doctor or contact the researcher. Your doctor may suggest a trial, or you can search for studies on your own.

A website, www.clinicaltrials.gov, is a one-stop registry of federally and privately supported clinical trials being conducted in all 50 states and 176 countries around the world.


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What Happens in a Clinical Trial?

Making the Decision to Join a Clinical Trial

People have different reasons for joining a trial, including:

  • Hoping to benefit from a promising treatment or new drugs
  • Participation may help other people or advance science
  • Access to additional health care provided by being part of a study

Participating in research isn't for everyone. Being a study volunteer can require more checkups, record-keeping, and follow-up after the study is over. If you are too busy to keep your appointments or don't think you can follow detailed instructions, a study may not be right for you.

If you are considering joining a clinical trial or research study at the Clinical Research Center, contact the Research Nurse Navigator at 913-945-7552.

Last modified: May 03, 2012
What is Informed Consent?

Informed consent is a voluntary agreement between who is in charge of the study and you. Informed consent is a lot more than signing a paper -- it is communication that continues throughout your participation in the trial.

The study investigator's responsibility is to keep you informed of all study activities, and it is your responsibility to accurately reflect your reactions and responses to the study.

For more details about informed consent, visit the National Cancer Institute website.

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