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Community Engagement award winners

The Institute for Community Engagement and the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor sponsor annual awards to recognize KU Medical Center faculty, students and community partners for excellence in community engagement.

2017

Pictured: Douglas A. Girod, M.D., Allen Greiner, Jr., M.D., Ryan Spalding

Allen Greiner, Jr., M.D., (center) awarded for improving the health of Kansas and beyond. The 2017 Faculty Award for Scholarship in Community Engagement was presented to Allen Greiner, Jr., M.D., professor within the KU School of Medicine family medicine research division. This award recognizes KU Medical Center faculty for excellence in developing, implementing and sustaining regional engaged scholarship initiatives.

Dr. Greiner has close to two decades of experience working with rural communities. He is frequently found at health fairs and community meetings working to advance health care across Kansas. Since 2001, Dr. Greiner has supported a practice-based primary care research network called Kansas Physicians and Providers Engaged in Prevention Research (KPPEPR).

Pictured: Douglas A. Girod, M.D., chancellor of the University of Kansas, Allen Greiner, Jr., M.D., professor, Ryan Spaulding, Ph.D., vice chancellor for community engagement.

2016

Pictured: Ryan Spalding, Cheryl Gibson and Wendy Hildenbrand

Cheryl Gibson, Ph.D., associate professor of general and geriatric medicine, received the 2016 Faculty Award for Scholarship in Community Engagement for leading the Community Health Project for 13 years, among many other research and service activities, particularly in Wyandotte County. This award, sponsored by the Institute of Community Engagement, recognizes faculty for enduring dedication to the principles of engaged scholarship, including excellence in developing, implementing and sustaining regional engaged scholarship initiatives. Dr. Gibson is donating a portion of her award money back to three community organizations: KC Healthy Kids, Rosedale Development Association and Kansas City Care Clinic. Pictured: Ryan Spaulding, Ph.D., vice chancellor for community engagement, Cheryl Gibson, Ph.D. and Wendy Hildenbrand, clinical assistant professor of occupational therapy education, who nominated Dr. Gibson.

2015

Award presentation photos with KUMC leadership and the winners: Gary Doolittle and Argentine Initiative representatives holding their awards. Full captions are listed below this photo.

Left: Gary Doolittle, M.D., professor of hematology/oncology, The Capitol Federal Masonic Professor at The University of Kansas Cancer Center, and medical director of the Midwest Cancer Alliance (MCA), received the Faculty Award for Scholarship in Community Engagement. For more than 20 years, Doolittle has worked with rural communities, from telemedicine programs to tobacco and cancer control initiatives to his work with the MCA in collaboration with health care providers across Kansas. Pictured: Gary Doolittle, M.D., and Ryan Spaulding, Ph.D., vice chancellor for community engagement.

Right: The Argentine Healthy Food Initiative, a research, education and outreach program led by the Department of Family Medicine's Natabhona Mabachi, Ph.D., assistant professor, and Kim Kimminau, Ph.D., associate professor, received the Community Partnership Award. This award recognizes KU Medical Center faculty and community partners the Argentine Neighborhood Development Association for their efforts to increase nutrition literacy and healthy eating in the Argentine community. Pictured: Natabhona Mabachi, Ph.D., Ann Murguia, executive director of the Argentine Neighborhood Development Association, Ryan Spaulding, Ph.D., vice chancellor for community engagement.

Student award winners

Gage Brummer — Brummer was chosen as the Student Community Leader Award recipient. In his three semesters of medical school, Brummer has volunteered at JayDoc Free Clinic 62 times; estimating his total service at more than 217 hours. As one of JayDoc's most valued volunteers, Brummer embodies JayDoc's mission of caring for the underserved in Wyandotte County while similarly encouraging educational opportunities for students. Brummer is considered a leader among his classmates and a mentor to his peers. First-year medical students often request to volunteer with Brummer commenting that he is the type of guy they want to grow up to become. Additionally, Brummer strives to include all members of the patient care team in his interactions at JayDoc, thus supporting JayDoc's goal of promoting interprofessional education amongst students from a variety of healthcare disciplines.

Student National Medical Association — The SNMA received the Coommunity Project Award for their Hepatitis C clinic, which has been serving patients in the Kansas City area since October 2014. Since the start of the project, the Hepatitis C Clinic has been a student-run clinic that is run bi-weekly by SNMA. The clinic has also given medical and nursing students an opportunity to take a patient's history, take vital signs, present to attendings and understand the benefits of continuity of care. The ultimate goal for this clinic is to be able to purchase the Harvoni treatment for a curable disease like Hepatitis C through grants.


2014

Award presentation photos with KUMC leadership and the winners: Paula Cupertino and Healthy Living Kansas representatives holding their awards. Full captions are listed below this photo.

Left: Paula Cupertino, Ph.D., associate professor in Preventive Medicine and Public Health, and director of JUNTOS Center for Advancing Latino Health, was named the 2014 winner of the Faculty Award for Scholarship in Community Engagement. This award recognizes Cupertino's excellence in developing, implementing and sustaining regional engaged scholarship initiatives with the local and regional Latino community. Pictured: Ryan Spaulding, Ph.D., vice chancellor for community engagement; Paula Cupertino, Ph.D.; and Executive Vice Chancellor Doug Girod, M.D. 

Right: Healthy Living Kansas, a research, education and outreach program led by Kimberly Engelman, Ph.D., associate professor in Preventive Medicine and Public Health, received the 2014 KU Medical Center Community Partnership Award. This award recognizes the Healthy Living Kansas team and community partners Early Detection Works and the United Methodist Mexican American Ministries for Promotoras de Salud, a breast health program in southwest Kansas. Pictured: Ryan Spaulding, Ph.D., vice chancellor for community engagement; Kimberly Engelman, Ph.D.; and School of Medicine Dean Robert Simari, M.D.

Student award winners

Brittany Bruce — Bruse was named the Student Community Leader Award winner. While serving as the co-president of Student National Medical Association, Bruce created a fundraiser that raised over $2,000 to help implement a new obesity awareness program for the Boys & Girls Club of Kansas City. Bruce also serves on Kansas City American Heart Association's Multicultural Leadership Committee, where she has been able to help brainstorm, plan and implement ways to reduce cardiovascular disparities in minority populations. They have hosted several events partnering with local organizations to test blood pressure and have physicians come talk to the public about adapting a more heart-healthy lifestyle.

(No Community Project Award entries this year)


2013 (inaugural year)

Photo of Christine Daley     Photo of Steve Simpson

Left: Christine Daley, Ph.D., associate professor in Family Medicine, and director of the Center for American Indian Community Health and the American Indian Health Research and Education Alliance, was named the inaugural recipient of the Faculty Award for Scholarship in Community Engagement. The award recognizes Daley's excellence in developing, implementing and sustaining regional engaged scholarship initiatives with local and regional American Indian communities.

Right: The Kansas Sepsis Project, a research, education and outreach program led by Steve Simpson, M.D., professor of pulmonology, received the inaugural Community Partnership Award. The award recognizes the Kansas Sepsis Project team — which uses quality improvement as a mechanism for continuing medical and nursing education, and seeks to reduce the death rate in partner-hospitals by 10 percent — and partner-hospitals.

Student award winners

Erin Locke — Locke, a student at the School of Medicine–Wichita, received the 2012 Student Community Leader Award for her commitment to rural health. 

BullDoc Free Clinic — The 2012 Community Project Award recipient is run by medical students and was recognized for its commitment to an underserved community. The clinic is a school-based health center, created by medical students, that offers a variety of health care services to students who may not otherwise see a doctor.

Last modified: Oct 15, 2019
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